Proposed Amendment: Chapter 11.1

Closeddate_range31 May, 2021, 9:00am - 29 Jun, 2021, 4:00pm

DEVELOPMENT MANAGEMENT STANDARDS
AND LAND USE ZONING OBJECTIVES

11.1 Introduction

This Chapter sets out the development standards and land use zoning objectives to be applied in the assessment of planning applications to ensure that development takes place in an orderly manner in the interests of the common good.

This chapter should be read in conjunction with the remainder of the Development Plan. Please note parking requirements for all development types are set out in Section 9. Section 4 which sets out general development standards should be considered in all cases when designing a development.

Please note that the Policies of the Council are labelled as ‘POL’ and Objectives of the Council are labelled as ‘OBJ’ within this chapter.

 

Section 1 – Statutory & Policy Context

11.1.1 Statutory Context

Planning and Development Act 2000, as amended, and Planning and Development Regulations, 2001, as amended.

Section 34 of the Planning and Development Act 2000, as amended, sets out the process to be followed when seeking planning permission for the development of land.

Section 28 of the Planning and Development Act 2000, as amended, provides that guidelines can be issued at any time by the Minister to Planning Authorities regarding any of their functions under the Act and Planning Authorities are required to comply with any guidelines issued under Section 28 in the performance of their functions.

Planning Authorities are required to have regard to Ministerial guidelines when assessing planning applications.

Planning and Development (Housing) and Residential Tenancies Act 2016

This Act provides that certain planning applications for certain types of housing development (SHD’s) could be made directly to An Bord Pleanála. The associated regulations, the Planning and Development (SHD) Regulations 2017 came into effect in July 2017.

The Strategic Housing Development legislation was introduced as part of the Governments Policy- ‘Rebuilding Ireland’ and is intended to accelerate the delivery of large housing and student accommodation proposals.

11.1.2 Policy Context

This section is not exhaustive; however the principal documents which should be consulted are set out below. Further details can be obtained from www.housing.gov.ie.

  • Design Standards for New Apartments, Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2018), Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government.
  • Urban Development and Building Heights, Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2018), Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government.
  • Design Manual for Urban Roads and Streets (2019), (DMURS), Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport and the Department of Environment, Community & Local Government.
  • The Planning System and Flood Risk Management (and Technical Appendices) – Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2009), Department of Environment, Heritage & Local Government and OPW.
  • Sustainable Residential Development in Urban Areas (Cities, Towns & Villages) (2009), Department of Environment, Heritage & Local Government.
  • Sustainable Rural Housing Guidelines (2005), Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government. The following circular was issued since the publication of these guidelines:
    • Circular PL 2/2017 Sustainable Rural Housing Guidelines for Planning Authorities 2005 – Local Needs Criteria in Development Plans.
  • Urban Design Manual-A Best Practice Guide (2009), Department of Environment, Heritage & Local Government.
  • Wind Energy Development Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2006), Department of Environment, Heritage & Local Government. A number of circulars have been issued since the publication of these guidelines including the following:
    • Circular PL 5/2017 Interim Guidelines for Planning Authorities on Statutory Plans, Renewable Energy and Climate change and Wind Energy Development Guidelines 2006- Update on Review.
    • Circular PL 20/2013 Review of Wind Energy and Renewable Energy Policies in Development Plans
    • Circular PL 19/2013 Review of 2006 Wind Energy Development Guidelines
    • Circular Letter PD/3/08 Wind Energy Developments – Planning Permission and Grid Connections
  • Telecommunications Antennae and Support Structures, Guidelines for Planning Authorities, (1996), Department of Environment and Local Government. The following circular was issued since the publication of these guidelines:
    • Circular PL03/2018 Revision of Development Contribution Guidelines in respect of Telecommunications Infrastructure.
  • Retail Planning Guidelines (2012), Department of Environment, Community and Local Government.
  • Spatial Planning and National Roads Guidelines, (2012), Department of Environment, Community and Local Government.
  • Development Management Guidelines (2007), Department of Environment and Local Government.
  • Childcare Facilities Guidelines (2001), Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government.
  • Sustainable Residential Development in Urban Areas (2009), Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government.
  • Urban Design Manual (2009), Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government.
  • Part V of the Planning and Development Act 2000 (2000), Department of the Environment and Local Government. Further Guidelines on Part V of the Planning and Development Act were issued in 2003 and 2017. In addition, a number of circulars have been issued following the publication of these guidelines including the following:
    • Circular Housing 5 of 2017 – Part V of the Planning and Development Act 2000 – Guidelines January 2017, Department of Housing, Planning, Community and Local Government.
    • Circular Housing 20 of 2016 and Planning 4 of 2016
    • Circular PL 10/2015 Part V – Implementation of Article 22(2)(e) of the Planning and Development Regulations 2001, as amended – Validation of Planning Applications.
  • Quarries and Ancillary Activities (2004), Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government and Section 261A Supplementary Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2012), Department of Environment, Community and Local Government.
  • Towards Nearly Zero Energy Buildings in Ireland - Planning for 2020 & Beyond (2012), Department of Environment, Community & Local Government. European Energy Performance of Buildings Directive Recast (EPBD -EU Directive 2010/31/EU) requires all new buildings occupied after the 31st December 2020 to be Nearly Zero – Energy Buildings  (NZEB) and all new buildings owned and occupied by public bodies after the 31st December 2018 to be NZEB.
  • Energy Efficiency in Traditional Buildings (2010), Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government.
  • Bringing Back Homes Manual for the reuse of existing buildings (2018), Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government.
  • Best Practice Guidelines, Quality Housing for Sustainable Communities (2007), Department  of Environment, Heritage & Local Government.
  • Smarter Travel – A Sustainable Transport Future – A New Transport Policy for Ireland (2009- 2020), Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport.
  • Irish Design Manual for Urban Roads and Streets (2013), Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport and Department of Housing Planning and Local Government.
  • National Cycle Policy Framework 2009-2020, Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport.
  • National Energy Efficiency Action Plan for Ireland 2009-2020, Department of Communications, Climate Action & Environment.
  • Government White Paper Ireland’s Transition to a Low Carbon Energy Future 2015-2030, Department of Communications, Energy & National Resources.
  • National Renewable Energy Action Plan, Ireland (2010), Department of Communications, Climate Change & Environment.
  • National Climate Change Adaptation Framework; Building Resilience to Climate Change (2012), Department of Environment, Community & Local Government.
  • National Mitigation Plan (2017), Department of Communications, Climate Change & Environment.
  • National Biodiversity Action Plan 2017-2021, Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht
  • The Building Control Acts, 1990 and 2014 and technical guidance documents, particularly Part L of the Building Regulations for Domestic and non Domestic Buildings, conservation of fuel and energy. Part M regarding universal access.
  • Guidelines on Residential Development for 3rd Level Students (1999) and the supplementary review document of July 2005, Department of Education and Science.
  • A number of circulars have been issued by the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government in relation to short-term letting as follows:
    • Circular PL 05/2019 Regulation of Short Term Letting – New Rent Pressure Zone Designations
    • Circular PL 04/2019 New Regulation on Short Term Letting
    • Circular Letter PL 10/2017 guidance on Planning Applications for Short Term Lettings

11.1.3 Environmental Impact Assessment

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is the process of examining the anticipated environmental effects of a proposed project - from consideration of environmental aspects at design stage, through consultation and preparation of an Environmental Impact Assessment Report (EIAR), evaluation of the EIAR by a Competent Authority, the subsequent decision as to whether the project should be permitted to proceed, encompassing public response to that decision.

Circular letter PL 1/2017 confirms that an EIAR submitted to the EPA or other Consent Authorities on or after the 16th May 2017 must meet the requirements of Directive 2014/52/EU.

An EIAR is required to accompany a planning application for development of a class set out in Schedule 5 of the Planning and Development Regulations 2001, as amended, which exceeds a limit, quantity or threshold set for that class of development. In the assessment of the EIAR of the proposed development (including the entire project), the relevant guidelines include the DECLG (2013) Guidelines for Planning Authorities and An Bord Pleanála on carrying out Environmental Impact Assessment.

The EIA Portal, hosted on the Department of Housing and Planning’s website, is a central point for notification to the public on all applications for development consent that are subject to an EIA, including development, works or activities, made across the country and under the various legislative codes. Further information can be found at; https://www.housing.gov.ie/planning/environmental-assessment/environmental-impact- assessment-eia/eia-portal.

11.1.4 Appropriate Assessment

Appropriate Assessment is a focused and detailed assessment regarding the implementation of a plan or project, alone and in combination with other plans and projects, on the integrity of a Natura 2000 site. There are four phases to the process, firstly the preparation of a Screening Report (Stage 1) and if, following screening, it is considered that further assessment is required a Natura Impact Statement (Stage 2 Appropriate Assessment) must be prepared (Refer to Chapter 8- Cultural & Natural Heritage Strategy and in particular HER OBJ 32 for further detail and guidance on AA). The remaining two phases are assessment of alternative solutions (Stage 3) and assessment where no alternative solutions exist  and where adverse impacts remain (Stage 4).

Section 2 – Pre-application discussions
 

11.2.1 Pre-Application Discussions

Section 247 of the Planning and Development Act, 2000 (as amended) sets out the formal procedure for prospective applicants seeking planning advice. The Planning Authority actively encourages pre-application discussions prior to the submission of any planning application.

The Planning and Development Act 2018 amended Section 247 of the Planning and Development Act 2000 to provide for at least one pre-application consultation for development of:

  • (i) more than 10 housing units (to include Part V);
  • or non-residential development of more than 1,000 square metres gross floor space (Gross floor space is clarified as meaning the internal measurement of the floor space on each floor of a building (including internal walls and partitions), disregarding any floor space provided for the parking of vehicles) ; and
  • or (ii) such other development as may be prescribed.

Such consultations shall be held within 4 weeks of the date of receipt of a request for a meeting, unless extended by a specified period. The failure of the Planning Authority to comply shall not prevent an applicant from making a planning application. Regulations may be made with respect to this procedure.

There are assessments that may be deemed necessary to accompany planning applications including, but not limited to: Flood Risk Assessment, Landscape Impact Assessment, Archaeological Assessment, Architectural Assessment, Ecology/Biodiversity- including for example bat surveys. These requirements are decided on a case by case basis, and these are discussed with the Planning Authority at pre-application discussion stage.

Traffic and Transport Assessment (TTA), Road Safety Audits (RSA) and Road Safety Impact Assessments are required to accompany planning applications for major developments with significant potential to generate traffic and or which could create a significant hazard or safety performance impact on a major road, particularly national roads. When preparing the TTA’s regard should be had to the provision of the NRA’s ‘Design Manual for Urban Roads and Streets and the ‘Traffic Management Guidelines, 2012’. Where a Transport and Traffic Assessment identifies necessary on and off-site improvements for the development to be able to proceed, the developer will be required to fund the improvements by entering into a formal agreement with the Council.


The requirement for a TTA is at the discretion of the Council but the following thresholds can be used for guidance purposes only:

  • Traffic to and from the proposed development exceeds 10% of the traffic flow on the adjoining road;
  • Traffic to and from the proposed development exceeds 5% of the traffic flow on the adjoining road where congestion exists;
  • Residential development in excess of 100 dwellings (Applications for 100 or more dwellings are decided by An Bord Pleanála as an SHD);
  • Retail and leisure development in excess of 1,000 sq.m;
  • Industrial development in excess of 5,000 sq.m, and; and
  • Distribution and warehousing in excess of 10,000 sq.m.

11.2.2 Small-Scale Projects & Rural Development

Clinics which facilitate pre-application discussions for smaller scale projects, including residential development of less than 100 units, non-residential development of more than 1,000 square metres gross floor space and rural development are currently held fortnightly. Further information and how to obtain an appointment are set out at www.meath.ie.

11.2.3 Economic Development

The Council seeks to positively assist businesses during the planning process by offering relevant advice and assistance for proposals of economic importance. The Council's staff are available to advise and assist potential investors.

Pre-application enquiries for economic proposals are afforded priority. Decision making is expedited where possible. Further information and how to obtain an appointment are set out at www.meath.ie.

11.2.4 Strategic Housing Development (SHD)

Applications for 100 or more dwellings are decided by An Bord Pleanála as an SHD. Strategic Housing Development (SHD) applications are defined as applications for:

  • The development of 100 or more houses on land zoned for residential use or for a mixture of residential and other uses;
  • The development of student accommodation units which, when combined, contain 200 or more bed spaces, on land the zoning of which facilitates the provision of student accommodation or a mixture of student accommodation and other uses thereon;
  • Development as outlined above or containing a mix of houses and student accommodation; and
  • The alteration of an existing planning permission where the proposed alteration related to development specified above.

The Planning Authority is statutorily required to facilitate pre-planning discussions in respect of prospective Strategic Housing Developments.

The SHD provisions applied for an initial period, until the end of 2019 and have since been extended by Government Order until 31/12/2021 to coincide with the timeframe of Rebuilding Ireland.

Further details regarding the SHD process are available from www.pleanala.ie.

11.2.5 Strategic Infrastructure Development (SID)

The Planning and Development (Strategic Infrastructure) Act 2006 provides that applications for permission/approval for specified private and public infrastructure developments should be made to An Bord Pleanála. These developments are listed in the 7th schedule of the Planning and Development Act 2000, as amended, and include major energy, transport, environmental and health infrastructure developments.

It is a mandatory requirement for a prospective applicant applying for planning permission for development listed in the 7th Schedule to enter into pre-application consultations with the Board and obtain notice from the Board stating whether or not the proposed development is regarded as strategic infrastructure development. For the purposes of these consultations, the prospective applicant must supply sufficient information to the Board to enable it to assess the proposed development in the light of the criteria set out for strategic infrastructure development.

Section 3 – Public Realm

11.3.1 Public Realm

Meath’s built, cultural and natural heritage has an intrinsic value in defining the character of urban and rural areas and adding to their attractiveness and sense of place. Public realm has a key role to play in this process. Public realm consists of all areas to which the public has access (such as roads, streets, paths, lanes, parks, squares and bridges). It includes the publicly accessible spaces between buildings, along with the buildings or other structures that enclose them. The quality of the public realm plays a vital role in the creation of a place with an enhanced sense of identity, where people will choose to spend their time. It gives great scope for public art, community-based activities, temporary interventions/events, ‘greening’ the town/village centres with landscaping and the inclusion of creative lighting schemes. The public realm provides the context for highlighting the built heritage. Well maintained and presented buildings are an important component of the public realm.

There is now a better understanding of the economic, social and environmental benefits that public realm can contribute to an area. It is acknowledged that a successful public realm is a component of a successful place. The importance of investment in public realm is recognised in the National Planning Framework, 2018 as one of the ‘key factors in developing, promoting and investing in a sense of place and aligning the objectives of creating high quality with that of spatial planning.’ (National Policy Objective 18 (a) refers). This is further reflected by the Governments commitment to public realm improvement projects in the Urban and Rural Regeneration and Development Funds.

Public Realm Plans have been prepared by Meath County Council for Ashbourne (Ashbourne Public Realm Strategy, July 2018) and Navan (Navan 2030-Public Realm Strategy, December 2016). Public Realm Plans are nearing completion for Athboy, Bettystown/Laytown and Oldcastle. Public Realm Plans are also currently advancing for brownfield underutilised sites in Navan in need of regeneration (i.e. Flowerhill/Abbeylands and lands at Railway Street) where funding was successfully secured through the Urban Regeneration Fund. All of the aforementioned strategies are the result of input from multidisciplinary teams and extensive public consultation. These consultations are instrumental in exploring and identifying the best way to help an area reach its full potential.

The Public Realm Plans will be used as a tool to guide the development of these central areas into the future.  These strategies seek to strengthen and enhance the attributes of a town or village which contributes to the distinctive physical and social character of the area. While these strategies are design-led, compliance with prevailing planning legislation and Development Plan context is required. These strategies will continue to be promoted and it is proposed to extend this programme to include other settlements such as Kells, Ratoath and Duleek.

DM POL 1:     To support, be proactive and implement the objectives, actions and recommendations of the Public Realm Plans as completed.

DM OBJ 1:     To prepare and implement Public Realm Strategies, throughout the County where appropriate, liaising closely with residents, community and local business groups and other relevant stakeholders.

DM OBJ 2:     To enhance the visual amenity of existing town and village centres, minimising unnecessary clutter, and provide guidance on public realm design, including wirescape, shopfront design, street furniture and signage.

DM OBJ 3:     To implement the following Public Realm Strategies: Navan 2030, Ashbourne, Athboy, Laytown/Bettystown, Oldcastle, Flowerhill and County Hall/St Pat’s Classic School (Navan), when complete.

DM OBJ 4:     To prepare a Public Realm Strategy for Kells and Ratoath over the lifetime of this Development Plan.

 

Section 4 – General Development Standards
 

11.4    General Standards applicable to all Development Types

11.4.1 Energy Efficiency

Mitigation of the causes and impacts of climate change is one of the cross-cutting themes of this Development Plan. The importance of reducing energy requirements associated with the built environment is one of the challenges identified in  the  Climate  Action Plan 2019. The issues to be considered in addressing this challenge include selection of building materials, type of buildings being constructed, orientation on site and life time energy demands of the building. The challenge presented in measuring the carbon footprint of new residential development is currently being examined by EMRA in conjunction with other State Agencies. It is noted that ongoing research relating to the number of jobs located in towns and the size of the resident population forms part of this process. The ‘live work’ community concept, one of the key tenets of this plan represents a solution to the disconnect between where people live and work, this is particularly relevant to County Meath which experienced the highest level of out-bound commuting in 2016 (Census 2016).

The Council’s approach to encouraging gains in energy efficiency is based on the following concepts:

  • Focus on compact sustainable growth as set out in the National Planning Framework;
  • Increased energy efficiency in the design of buildings,
  • Increased promotion of sustainable mobility measures in order to achieve significant future reductions in energy demands.

DM POL 2:           Appropriate energy conservation strategies should be employed in location, design, mass, orientation and the choice of materials of all new and renovated developments.

DM OBJ 5:           Building design which minimises resource consumption, reduces waste, water and energy use   shall be incorporated where possible, in all new and renovated developments.

DM OBJ 6:           Building design shall maximise natural ventilation, solar gain and daylight, where possible, all new and renovated developments.

DM OBJ 7:           Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SuDS)  measures are required to form part of the design of all developments.


11.4.2 Access for All

Universal equality of access to all aspects of the built and external environment is an essential part of an inclusive society. Part M of the Building Regulations (Public Buildings & Residential Dwellings) sets out standards to ensure that buildings are accessible to and usable by everyone, including older people, people with disabilities and people with children.

DM OBJ 8:           The Council will seek to encourage the implementation of best practice standards with regard to access in both indoor and outdoor environments.

11.4.3 Public Lighting

Functioning public lighting that is well designed and suitably located is of critical importance to our urban communities. It is important that trees and other vegetation do not impede the functions of public lighting units. Trees planted in close proximity to public lighting often block the light, rendering the light useless. This can lead to road safety issues, security concerns for residents and leads to demands on the Council to prune or remove the problematic trees.

DM POL 3:        All public lighting proposals shall be in accordance with the Councils Public   Lighting Technical Specification & Requirements, June 2017, and the Council’s Public Lighting Policy, December 2017, (or any updates thereof).

DM OBJ 9:        A separation distance of 5 metres between the lighting column and the outside of the crown is required for the lighting to work as designed. Trees or vegetation shall not be planted within 7 metres of a public light column.

DM OBJ 10:      The design of all new developments shall take into consideration the layout of the proposed public lighting column locations and the proposed landscape design. Both layouts should achieve the 7 metres separation between all trees and public lighting columns.

11.4.4 Trees and Hedgerows

Trees and Hedgerows are an important consideration with all developments and it is considered that the retention of trees and hedgerows should be considered as part of any relevant planning application. Please refer to Section 9.8 ‘Tree and Hedgerow Preservation’ in Chapter 9 for further details in this regard.

DM OBJ 11:        Existing trees and hedgerows of biodiversity and/or amenity value shall be retained, where possible.

Section 5 – Residential Development Standards
 

11.5.1 Residential Development

This section sets out the Development Management Standards for residential development in towns and villages. Development Management Standards for rural nodes, rural dwellings and rural extensions in the open countryside are contained in Chapter 9 Rural Development Strategy. Please note that parking standards (car and cycle) applicable to residential development are set out  in Section 9. Section 4 General Development Standards and Section 15 Land Use Zoning Objectives should also be consulted.

11.5.2 Urban Design

Design of development must demonstrate compliance with relevant National, Regional and Local planning policy while promoting best practice in architectural design incorporating the principles of sustainability, energy efficiency and accessibility. Urban design is concerned with the relationships of buildings to each other and to the spaces around them. Good urban design is fundamental to creating and shaping vibrant urban places.

The key principles of good urban design are set out in the Urban Design Manual (2009) as follows:

  • Context
  • Connections
  • Inclusivity
  • Variety
  • Efficiency
  • Distinctiveness
  • Layout
  • Public Realm
  • Adaptability
  • Privacy and Amenity
  • Parking
  • Detailed Design

Residential development proposals shall demonstrate compliance with the above principles.

DM POL 4:        To require that all proposals for residential development demonstrate compliance with the Sustainable Residential Development in Urban Areas - Cities, Towns & Villages (2009)  and the Urban Design Manual-A Best Practice Guide, 2009 or any updates thereof.

DM OBJ 12:      To encourage and facilitate innovative design solutions for medium to high density residential schemes where substantial compliance with normal development management considerations can be demonstrated.

DM OBJ 13:      A detailed Design Statement shall accompany all planning applications for residential

development on sites in excess of 0.2 hectares or for more than 10 residential units.

The Design Statement shall:

  • Provide a Site Analysis
  • Outline the design concept;
  • Clearly demonstrate how the 12 Urban Design Criteria have been taken into account when designing schemes in urban area (as per the 'Urban Design Manual - A Best Practice Guide (2009)’);
  • Set out how the development meets the relevant Development Plan Objectives, Local Area Plan, Masterplan, Public Realm Strategy etc;
  • Provide site photographs;
  • Provide an open space/landscape strategy which identifies any areas of ecological interest and sets out proposals for same; and
  • Set out how energy efficiency measures have been incorporated into the project design process (Refer to DM POL 2).

11.5.3            Density

In general, the number of units to be provided on a site should be determined with reference to the Guidelines for Planning Authorities on ‘Sustainable Residential Development in Urban Areas’ (2009) or any update thereof. This Plan seeks to promote the development of ‘live work’ communities by promoting sustainable development by creating compact, high quality developments. Higher residential densities will be encouraged within walking distance of town centres and public transport infrastructure.

It is acknowledged that there may be instances where specified densities cannot be achieved due to specific circumstances such as site constraints; however, all developments should strive to achieve the prescribed density in order to support the delivery of more compact development and to ensure a maximum return on investment in social and physical infrastructure.

DM POL 5:        To promote sustainable development, a range of densities appropriate to the scale of settlement, site location, availability of public transport and community facilities including open space will be encouraged.

DM OBJ 14:       The following densities shall be encouraged when considering planning applications for residential development:

  • Residential Development Beside Rail Stations: 50 uph or above
  • Regional Growth Centres/Key Towns: (Navan/Drogheda) - 35-45 uph
  • Self-Sustaining Growth Towns: (Dunboyne, Ashbourne, Trim, Kells): greater than 35uph
  • Self-Sustaining Towns: 25uph - 35uph
  • Smaller Towns and Villages: 25uph - 35 uph
  • Outer locations: 15uph – 25uph

It should be noted that SPPR 1 of the Urban Development and Building Heights Guidelines for Planning Authorities December 2018 shall be considered in the implementation of the above densities.

11.5.4 Plot Ratio

Plot ratio seeks to control the mass and bulk of buildings to prevent the adverse effect of over-development whilst ensuring the efficient and sustainable use of serviced land. Plot ratio is calculated as the gross building(s) floor area divided by the gross site area. For clarity, the gross floor area is the sum of all floor space within the external walls of the buildings, excluding basement, plant, tank rooms and above level car parking areas with the gross site area constituting all land within the curtilage of the site.

To ensure an appropriate level of development, plot ratio standards need to be used in combination with other development management standards, including site coverage, building height, public and private open space, and parking provision. Plot ratio will apply to both new buildings and extensions to existing buildings.  A maximum 50% of any development on C1 zoned lands can comprise of residential development, please refer to Chapter 2 Core Strategy for further details. A maximum 30% of any development on B1 zoned lands can comprise of residential development, please refer to Chapter 2  Core Strategy for further detail in this regard and Section 14 ‘Land Use Zoning Objectives’ within this chapter.

DM OBJ 15:     As a general rule, the indicative maximum plot ratio standard shall be 1.0 for housing at edge of town locations with an indicative maximum plot ratio of 2.0 in town centre/core locations.

11.5.5 Site Coverage

Site coverage standards seek to avoid adverse effects of over-development particularly in urban areas thereby safeguarding sunlight and daylight within or adjoining a proposed layout of buildings. Site coverage relates to the percentage of the development site covered by buildings and structures (excluding the public roads and footpaths) and is calculated by dividing the total area of ground covered by buildings by the total ground area within the site.

DM OBJ 16:     Site coverage shall generally not exceed 80%. Higher site coverage may be permissible in certain limited circumstances such as adjacent to public transport corridors; to facilitate areas identified for regeneration purposes; and areas where an appropriate mix of both residential and commercial uses is proposed.

11.5.6 Building Line

In the context of urban development, building lines should be followed where appropriate. Where located along major roads with significant traffic flows, increased set back may be required to provide for greater amenity and safety of road users and residents. On existing roads, building lines may be required to be set back to accommodate future road widening.

DM OBJ 17:      To seek to provide building setbacks along Motorways, National Primary, National Secondary, Regional and Local Roads to allow for future road improvements.

11.5.7 Separation Distances

DM OBJ 18:      A minimum of 22 metres separation between directly opposing rear windows at first floor level in the case of detached, semi- detached, terraced units shall generally be observed.

DM OBJ 19:      A minimum of 22 metres separation  distance of  between  opposing  windows will apply in the case of apartments/duplex units up to three storeys in height.

DM OBJ 20:      Any residential development proposal which exceeds three or more storeys in height shall demonstrate adequate separation distances having regard to  layout,  size and design between blocks to ensure privacy and protection of residential amenity.

DM OBJ 21:      A minimum distance of 2.3 metres shall be provided between dwellings for the full length of the flanks in all developments of detached, semi-detached and end of terrace houses.

The relaxation of any of the standards set out at DM OBJ 18-21 will be assessed on a case-by-case basis and should not be accepted as the Council setting a precedent for future development.

11.5.8 Dwelling Design, Size & Mix

All residential schemes should ensure an appropriate mix of housing typologies and unit sizes to support the provision of a variety of household types and tenures that accord with the Guidelines for Planning Authorities on Sustainable Residential Development in Urban Areas (2009).

The changing nature of the age profile of the County requires greater consideration of the housing needs of an ageing population. For those who wish to continue to live independently in their community but wish to downsize, it is imperative to offer a range of attractive and appropriately located accommodation choices which will in turn will enable the underutilisation of larger houses, particularly in more established areas, to be addressed. Design of accommodation needs to take account of the needs of persons with a disability.

Housing with long term adaptability and potential for flexibility allows for change as circumstances alter or families grow. Adaptability that allows for the alteration of the fabric of a building and flexibility which allows for spaces to accommodate a range of uses are key considerations in the design of a home.

A high standard of building design, specification of materials and detailing are required.

Contemporary designs are welcomed and will be assessed having regard to the context of the site.

All applications for residential development shall include a phasing plan. Phasing proposals shall ensure that open space and infrastructure to serve dwellings in a given phase e.g. public lighting, footpaths, and community facilities such as crèches and playgrounds are completed to the satisfaction of the Planning Authority prior to the initiation of the succeeding phase.

DM POL 6:        To require that the unit typologies proposed provide a sufficient unit mix which addresses wider demographic and household formation trends. The design statement required at DM OBJ 13 shall set out how the proposed scheme is compliant with same.

DM OBJ 22:      The design of any housing scheme shall have regard to the requirement for connectivity between residential areas, community facilities etc. The design of any walkways, lanes or paths connecting housing estates or within housing estates shall be of sufficient width to allow for the safe movement of pedestrians and cyclists. They shall be adequately overlooked and lit and not be excessive in length

DM OBJ 23:      To require that all applications for residential development shall be accompanied by a detailed phasing plan which demonstrates the early delivery of key infrastructure associated with that scheme.

DM OBJ 24:      To require the provision of EV charging points to serve residential development.

11.5.9 Building Height

The Urban Development and Building Height Guidelines (2018) require that Development Plans identify and provide policy support for specific geographic locations where increased building height is a fundamental policy requirement.

In this regard in accordance with SPPR1 of the Guidelines, the following locations have been identified as suitable to accommodate increased building height in the County:

  • Dunboyne at both Dunboyne Central and Pace rail stations,
  • Maynooth Environs,
  • Drogheda Environs,
  • Navan

DM OBJ 25:      To require development with increased building height at the following locations

  • Dunboyne Central rail station
  • Pace Rail Station
  • Maynooth Environs
  • Drogheda Environs
  • Navan

In all cases all proposals for buildings in excess of 6 stories at these locations shall be accompanied by a statement demonstrating compliance with the Urban Development and Building Heights, Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2018), or any updates thereof.

11.5.10 Open Space

The provision of accessible and useable open space is a critical element in community building. Existing green infrastructure should be identified at the initial stages of the design process and should guide the design of an appropriate site layout. A landscaping plan submitted with an application should clearly illustrate how existing green infrastructure and opportunities to create more linkages have informed and been incorporated into the development  layout.

11.5.11 Public Open Space

Public open space within residential developments should be designed so as to complement the residential layout and be informally supervised by residents. A variety of types and sizes of open spaces should be provided at suitable locations to cater for the active and passive recreational needs of children and adults of all ages.

DM OBJ 26:         Public open space shall be provided for residential development at a minimum    rate of 15% of total site area. In all cases lands zoned F1 Open Space, G1 Community Infrastructure and H1 High Amenity cannot be included as part of the 15%. Each residential development proposal shall be accompanied by a statement setting out how the scheme complies with this requirement.

DM OBJ 27:         Standalone residential developments comprising of 9 residential units or    less shall be exempt from the requirement to provide 15% open space. In all such cases the private amenity space serving each dwelling shall exceed the minimum requirement

11.5.12 Private Open Space

All houses should have an appropriate and useable area of private open space, exclusive of car parking, to the rear of the front building line. The minimum area of private open space to be provided is set out in Table 11.1. Exceptions to this may only be considered in relation to the redevelopment of brownfield/regeneration sites where a focus should be on design led and performance-based outcomes rather than specific absolute requirements in all cases. Flexibility will only be permissible in response to well–designed development proposals. Housing developments which provide private open space at the minimum standard throughout the scheme will be discouraged.

DM POL 7:        Residential development  shall  provide  private  open space  in accordance with the requirements set out in Table 11.1. Each residential development proposal shall be accompanied by a statement setting out how the scheme complies with the requirements set out in Table 11.1.

House Type

Minimum Area of Private Open Space to be Provided

One/two bedroom

55sq.m.

Three Bedroom

60sq.m.

Four bedrooms or more

75sq.m.

Table 11.1 Minimum Private Open Space Standards for Houses

11.5.13 Boundary Treatments

DM POL 8:        To require the provision of high quality, durable, appropriately designed, secure boundary treatments in all developments.

DM POL 9:        To support the retention of field boundaries for their ecological/habitat significance, as demonstrated by a suitably qualified professional. Where removal of a hedgerow, stone wall or other distinctive boundary treatment is unavoidable, mitigation by provision of the same boundary type will be required

DM OBJ 28:      To require that boundaries between the rear of existing and proposed dwellings shall be a minimum of 1.8 metres high and shall be constructed as capped, rendered concrete block or brick walls, to ensure privacy, security and permanency. Alternative durable materials will be considered.

DM OBJ 29:         To require that all rear boundaries within the development shall be a minimum of 1.8 metres high and shall be constructed as capped, rendered concrete block or brick walls, to ensure privacy, security and permanency. Alternative durable materials will be considered.

DM OBJ 30:         Open plan front gardens will generally be discouraged and will only be acceptable in innovative layouts and where a high level of safety is achieved and services can be accommodated at a location which meets the needs of service providers. Open plan gardens will not be permitted on main access roads. In general, front boundaries shall be defined by walls or fences at least 0.5 metres high in keeping with the house design and to a uniform scheme design.                  

DM OBJ 31:         In the case of residential development where the layout does not provide for front boundaries, there will be a general prohibition against the erection of front boundaries.

DM OBJ 32           To encourage the use of measures specifically designed to enhance wildlife in residential schemes such as gaps/holes should be considered and incorporated into boundary treatments to allow for passage of all wildlife including hedgehogs, bat boxes and swift bricks/boxes.

 

11.5.14 Naming of Residential Development

DM POL 10:      The name proposed for all residential developments shall be clearly linked with the locality in which the scheme is located.

DM OBJ 33:      In all cases the name chosen for a residential development shall reflect local place names, particularly townlands or local names which reflect the landscape or shall reflect culture and /or history, including names of historical persons who have some association with the area.

DM OBJ 34:      Names shall be in English accompanied by an Irish translation. Name plates shall   be fixed to walls and buildings where they can be clearly seen. Bilingual (Irish & English) street name plates, shall be erected on all estate roads at a location that is clearly visible.

DM OBJ 35:      In order to assist the public, all houses within housing estates or in street developments shall be provided with numbers and/or names, which shall be visible from the adjoining roadway.

DM OBJ 36:      Applicants shall, as part of pre-application discussions include three draft name proposals in accordance with DM OBJ 32 and 33 for consideration.

DM OBJ 37:      Three draft name proposals in accordance with above objectives shall be submitted to the Planning Authority as part of a planning application. The name shall be approved by the Meath County Council Naming Committee comprising of the Senior Executive Officer/Planner, Conservation Officer, Planning Department and County Librarian.

11.5.15 Art Work

DM OBJ 38:      All proposals for residential developments above 75 units shall incorporate works of public art into the overall scheme or make a financial contribution to the Council to provide the piece of public art in order to enhance the amenities of the local environment (Refer to Chapter 7, Community Building Strategy).

 

11.5.16 Light and Overshadowing

Daylight and sunlight levels should, generally, be in accordance with the recommendations of Site Layout Planning for Daylight and Sunlight: A Guide to Good Practice (B.R.209, 2011), and any updates thereof.

DM POL 11:      New residential development should be designed to maximise the use of natural daylight and sunlight. Innovative building design and layout that demonstrates a high level of energy conservation, energy efficiency and use of renewable energy sources will be encouraged.

11.5.17 Apartments

Please note this section must be considered in conjunction with Sections 4, 9 and 14 of this chapter.

DM POL 12:      Apartment schemes  shall  generally  be  encouraged  in  appropriate,    sustainable, locations, accessible to public transport in the following settlements: Drogheda, Navan, Dunboyne, Kilcock, Maynooth, Ashbourne and Dunshaughlin.

DM POL 13:      In towns and villages, there will be a general presumption against apartment developments however there are opportunities for infill developments and consolidation which would contribute to the regeneration of these settlements.

DM POL 14:      All planning applications for apartments are required to demonstrate compliance with ‘Sustainable Urban Housing; Design Standards for New Apartments’, Guidelines for Planning Authorities (2018) and any updates thereof. While these Guidelines set out minimum design standards, the Council strongly encourage the provision of apartments above these standards, in the interest of creating attractive living environments and sustainable communities.

DM OBJ 39:      An appropriate mix of units shall be provided to cater for a variety of household types and tenures. Apartment development proposals will be assessed having regard to the following requirements:

  • Aspect- dual aspect units are encouraged;
  • Mix of units- to cater for different size households;
  • Floor areas and room widths;
  • Private and communal amenity space;
  • Floor to ceiling height;
  • Car and bicycle parking;
  • EV Charging points;
  • Lift/ stair core access;
  • Storage provision;
  • Adaptability.

All planning applications for apartment development shall be accompanied by a statement which sets out how the scheme complies with this objective.

DM OBJ 40:      A Design Statement is required to be submitted with any planning application for apartment development.

11.5.18 Build to Rent and Shared Accommodation

The build to rent (BTR) and shared accommodation sectors are emerging sectors in housing provision. Specific Planning Policy Requirement 7 and 8 of the Sustainable Urban Housing: Design Standards for New Apartments sets out the requirements in respect of BTR schemes including specific reference in public notices that a BTR scheme is proposed, supporting communal and recreational amenities must be provided and details of same must accompany any planning application

The requirements in respect of shared accommodation or shared living/co-living are set out in Specific Planning Policy Requirement 9 of the Sustainable Urban Housing: Design Standards for New Apartments (2018).

DM OBJ 41:      To require that all planning applications for Build to Rent Schemes demonstrate compliance with Specific Planning Policy Requirement 7 and 8 of the Sustainable Urban Housing: Design Standards for New Apartments (2018) or any updates thereof.

 11.5.19 a) Infill Sites in Urban Areas

Infill development relates to development located in gaps between existing buildings in built-up urban areas. The Council will support infill development on appropriate sites that make the most sustainable use of serviced land and existing urban infrastructure.

DM OBJ 42:         Infill development shall take account of the character of the area and where possible retain existing features such as building line, height, railings, trees, gateways etc.

11.5.20 b) Backland Sites in Urban Areas

Backland residential development relates to small scale development located to the rear of existing buildings in built-up areas. Having regard to the requirement to protect the residential amenity and character of existing A1 zoned residential areas backland site development shall satisfy the criteria for  infill  development and avoid  undue  overlooking  and  overshadowing  of adjacent properties.

DM OBJ 43:      Backland development proposals shall avoid piecemeal development that adversely impacts on the character of the area and the established pattern of development.

11.5.21 Corner/Side Garden Sites

Corner Site/Side Garden development refers to sub-division of an existing house curtilage to provide an additional dwelling in existing built-up areas.

Larger corner sites may allow for a variation in dwelling design, however, proposals should more closely relate to adjacent dwellings, albeit with a modern design in order to avoid a pastiche development. At the discretion of the Planning Authority there may be some relaxation in private open space and car parking standards for this type of proposal. The Council will require corner site /side garden development proposals to have regard to the following criteria: Size, design, layout, building line and the relationship with existing dwellings and immediately adjacent properties; External finishes; Accommodation standards for the occupants; Car parking for existing and proposed development; Private open space for existing and proposed development; Development Plan standards for dwellings; Side/gable and rear access/maintenance space, where possible.

11.5.22 Upper Floors/ ‘Living over the Shop’

One of the guiding principles of the RSES 2019-2031 is to, ‘Set out measures to reduce vacancy and the underuse of existing building stock and support initiatives that promote the reuse, refurbishment and retrofitting of existing buildings within urban centres’. It is desirable to maintain an element of residential use in or close to town centres as it provides night time activity. Further, a more substantial residential presence adds to the vitality and viability of a town centre. Unfortunately, residential uses in some of our towns and villages have become limited. As such, proposals for the residential conversion of the upper floors of retail and commercial premises will be favourably considered. Any proposed residential use must respect the historic fabric (if relevant), whilst also providing adequate residential amenity.

In recognising the need to protect the historic fabric of our towns/villages while encouraging people to live in upper floors of retail/commercial premises, it is not always possible or practical to achieve current residential standards. In this regard, at the discretion of the Planning Authority and subject to protecting residential amenity, a reduction in open space and car parking standards may be considered for ‘living over the shop’ accommodation proposals particularly in town centre locations. Minimum standards in relation to overall floor areas, storage space and natural light must be complied with in order to protect residential amenity.

The Department of Environment has brought in exemptions in relation to vacant commercial buildings being converted to residential use (applies until 31st December 2021). In this regard, a manual was launched by the Minister of State for Housing and Urban Development in 2019 entitled, ‘Bringing Back Homes’, to assist property owners, the public, local authorities and the construction industry to develop vacant buildings. Further information can be found at www.housing.gov.ie

DM OBJ 44:      To require that these proposals accord with the relevant guidelines and standards contained in this Plan and should contribute positively to the renewal of these areas and to the established character and amenities of the area.

DM OBJ 45:      To require that a separate and distinctive point of entry with an identifiable address be provided. Mitigation measures to address possible sources of external noise should be provided.

DM OBJ 46:      To allow a reduction in open space and car parking standards for ‘living over the shop’ accommodation proposals in town centre locations, subject to protecting residential amenity, where considered appropriate by the Planning Authority.

11.5.23 Student Accommodation

The demand for high quality student accommodation is increasing nationally.

DM OBJ 47:      To require that all proposals for student accommodation comply with the Department of Education and Science Guidelines on Residential Development for Third Level Students (1999), the subsequent supplementary document (2005) and the ‘Student Accommodation Scheme’, Office of Revenue Commissioner (2007), or any updates thereof.

DM OBJ 48:      To require that written confirmation of a ‘Qualifying Lease’ as defined in the Guidelines on Residential Developments for Third Level Students published by the Department of Education and Science in 1999  which demonstrates that the that the accommodation is let to students within.

11.5.24 Family Flat Extensions

Family flats (often known as granny flats) are a way of providing additional accommodation with a level of independence for an undefined temporary period of time. Family flats allow for semi-independent accommodation for an immediate family member (dependent on the main occupants of the dwelling). Applications for family flats will be considered favourably subject to criteria set out in the relevant policy set out below.

DM POL 15:      The creation of a custom-built ‘family flat’ to be occupied by a member of the occupant family with a housing need is generally acceptable subject to site suitability and compliance with DM OBJ 48.

DM OBJ 49:      All applications for family flat development shall comply with the following criteria:

  • The flat shall form an integral part of the structure of the main house with provision for direct internal access to the remainder of the house i.e. not detached;
  • The flat  shall not have a separate access provided to the front elevation of the dwelling
  • There shall be no permanent subdivision of the garden/private amenity space;
  • The flat shall remain in the same ownership as that of the existing dwelling on site. In this regard, the flat shall not be let, sold or otherwise transferred, other than as part of the overall property;
  • The design proposed shall enable the flat to easily fully revert to being part of the original house when no longer occupied by the family member(s);
  • If the site is not connected to public mains, the existing wastewater treatment system on site must be capable for any additional loading from the flat, and if not proposals should be submitted to accommodate the additional loading.

11.5.25 Extensions in Urban Areas

Residential Extensions in the Rural Area and Rural Node Zones are addressed in Section 9.14 of Chapter 9. The objective below relates to residential extensions in urban areas.

DM OBJ 50:         All applications for residential extensions in urban areas shall comply with the following criteria:

  • High quality design which respects, harmonises and integrates with the existing dwelling  in terms of height, scale, materials used, finishes, window proportions, etc;
  • The quantity and quality of private open space that would remain to serve the house
  • Flat roof extensions, in a contemporary design context, will be considered on their individual merits;
  • Impact on amenities of adjacent residents, in terms of light and privacy. Care should be taken to ensure that the extension does not overshadow windows, yards or gardens or have windows in the flank walls which would reduce a neighbour’s privacy;
  • Extensions which break the existing front building line will not normally be acceptable. A porch extension which does not significantly break the front building line will normally be permitted;
  • Dormer extensions shall not obscure the main features of the existing roof, i.e. should not break the ridge or eaves lines of the roof;
  • Proposed side extensions shall retain side access to the rear of the property, where required for utility access, refuse collection etc.
  • Ability to provide adequate car parking within the curtilage of the dwelling house
  • In all cases where diversion or construction over existing sewerage and/or water mains is required, the consent of Irish Water will be required as part of the application;

11.5.26 Home Based Economic Activity

Home based economic activity is defined as small scale commercial activity carried out by residents of a house or person’s main residence, being subordinate to the use of the house as a single dwelling unit and includes working from home. The Council recognises that such working arrangements can benefit individuals, families and the local community in addition to contributing to more sustainable land use patterns by reducing the need for commuting. There is no objection to minor changes of use to allow for this provided the use remains ancillary to the main residential use, the applicant continues to reside in the house and the use has no adverse impact on the amenities of neighbouring dwellings.

DM OBJ 51:      In determining applications for developments involving working from home, the Council will have regard to the following:

  • The nature and extent of the work.
  • The impacts on the amenities of adjoining occupiers, particularly in relation to hours of work, noise and general disturbance.
  • Anticipated levels of traffic generated by the proposed development and the potential increased demand for parking.
  • Arrangements for the storage of refuse and collection of waste.
  • There will be a presumption in favour of this type of use in residential areas. However,  such use will not normally be permitted in apartments except in the case of own-door units accessed from street level.

11.5.27 Waste Management

Regard should be had to the number of individual bins required to serve each residential unit at design stage and in particular the requirement for segregating waste for recycling and food waste, (Refer to Chapter 6 Infrastructure for further details)

DM POL 16:      All new residential schemes shall include appropriately sited and designed secure refuse storage areas, details of which shall be clearly shown in pre-application discussion and planning application documentation

DM OBJ 52:      In residential schemes, appropriately sized bin storage areas must be provided to the front of terraced dwellings in locations which are easily accessible by the householder. These areas shall be well screened and the design shall  integrate with the dwelling.

DM OBJ 53:      Apartment schemes shall make provision for waste segregation and recycling. Bin storage shall generally be on the ground floor level of development, be adequately ventilated, screened from public view and adjacent to the block it serves. Where appropriate, the bin storage area shall be a separate structure to the apartment building.

DM OBJ 54:      Shared bin storage areas shall be located conveniently for residents and collection service providers with appropriate security measures.

11.5.28 Short Term Letting

Legislation to regulate the short term letting sector, Planning and Development Act 2000 (Exempted Development) (No. 2) Regulations 2019, came into effect on 1 July 2019 which is applicable only in areas designated as “rent pressure zones” (please refer to Chapter 3 Settlement and Housing Strategy to obtain further information on rent pressure zones). These regulations are intended to address the ‘impact on the private rental market by the use of residential homes for short-term tourism type letting in areas of high housing demand’. Short-term letting is defined as ‘the use of a bedroom or bedrooms in a home as paid overnight guest accommodation for a continuous period of up to 14 days.  Planning permission is now required to be obtained for a formal change of use. Further details can be obtained from:

https://www.housing.gov.ie/planning/private-rented-housing/new-regulation-short-term-letting

Section 6 – Employment Development Standards
 

11.6.1 Retail Development

Retailing has an important role in the economy of the County. Retail development is generally located at key locations in our urban areas and has an important contribution to make to the character and sense of place of urban spaces. It is essential therefore that retail development is of a high design quality and at an appropriate scale to the centre in which it is located. (Please refer to Chapter 4 Economy and Appendix 4 Retail Strategy for further information).

11.6.2 Fast Food/Takeaway Outlets

Fast food outlets have the potential to cause noise, littering and can detract from the amenities of  an area. Therefore proposals for new or extended outlets will be carefully considered, particularly in locations where a proliferation of such uses already exists. Chapter 7 of the Development Plan sets out the Council’s policies and objectives in respect of its ‘Healthy Meath Strategy’. An over concentration of such uses will affect the achievement of the objectives of this strategy.

DM POL 17:      To assess the appropriateness of any proposal for a new or extended takeaway/fast food outlet on the potential cumulative effect of these uses on the amenities of an area and schools.

DM OBJ 55:      To require that all proposals for new or extended fast food/takeaway outlets address the following as part of any pre- application discussion or planning application documentation:

  • The cumulative effect of fast food outlets on the amenities of an area.
  • Opening/operational hours of the facility.
  • The location of vents and other external services Advertising signage
  • External seating.

DM OBJ 56:      To only consider drive-through restaurants in locations where development will not interfere with the free flow of traffic or detract from the amenities of an area.

11.6.3 Shop Fronts

Shop fronts make a significant contribution to the visual amenities of a settlement and many have strong heritage value which should be preserved. The Council produced a ‘Shop front and Signage Guidance document in 2017 to assist designers of shop fronts and signage, which is available to download from www.meath.ie (Refer to Chapter 4 Economy and Employment Strategy).

DM POL 18:         To ensure new/replacement shop fronts are of an appropriate scale and design in order to integrate successfully with existing streetscapes.

DM OBJ 57:         To require that proposals for new/replacement shop fronts have regard to the ‘Shop front and Signage Guidance’ document, 2017 or any updates thereof.

11.6.4 Local/Neighbourhood Shopping Facilities

Shops in neighbourhood centres in our larger settlements perform a key function locally providing services including convenience shopping, laundry, hairdresser, takeaways etc. The aim of providing such shopping facilities locally serve catchment areas within approximately 800 metres is to reduce the necessity to travel by car to the town centre to avail of basic services and thereby ensure reduced traffic congestion and improved sustainability.

Additional neighbourhood facilities may be required as part of large residential developments, these will be determined on a case by case basis having regard to the policies and objectives of Chapter 4 Economy and Employment and the Retail Strategy in Appendix 4.

In rural villages and nodes, these facilities often provide a focal point for the locality and can include post services etc.

11.6.5 Service Stations

The role of service stations has become more diverse with the expansion from merely selling fuel to also providing convenience services and goods including functioning as rest areas. Ancillary uses include tyre repair, collection points for online retail activity and self-service launderettes.

Proposals for new and extended service stations will be carefully considered and will not generally be encouraged within the core retail area of urban centres or in rural areas outside of villages and rural nodes.

The Council supports the development of on-line motorway service facilities in appropriate locations in accordance with the guidance set out in the Spatial Planning and National Roads Guidelines for Planning Authorities, DECLG (2012).

DM POL 19:       Proposals for petrol filling stations in close proximity to the National Road   Network shall have regard to the “Spatial Planning and National Roads Guidelines for Planning Authorities”, Department of Environment Community and Local Government, 2012 and the Dangerous Substances (Retail and Private Petroleum Stores) Regulations 1979 to 2010 (or any such other relevant standards and legislation that may be enacted).

DM POL 20:       Proposals for new and extended service stations will be carefully considered and will not generally be encouraged within the core retail area of urban centres or in rural areas outside of villages and rural nodes and shall be located in all cases within the speed limit restriction zones.

DM POL 21:       Service stations will not generally be permitted in/adjoining residential areas, unless it can be clearly demonstrated no significant effect on residential amenities by reason of as noise, traffic, visual obtrusion, safety considerations or fumes and smells. Hours of operation will be limited if a service station is permitted in a residential area. Proposals to demonstrate the above will be required to be submitted as part of pre-application discussion and planning application documentation.

DM OBJ 58:         The following shall be submitted as part of pre-application discussion and/or planning application documentation for a service station:

  • A high quality design including roof design, layout and external finishes to ensure it integrates and complements the surrounding environment. The layout should provide for safe pedestrian access to the shop and rest facilities.
  • Adequate provision of rest areas and toilets accessible safely by pedestrians and cyclists.
  • Where the development would be likely to have a significant impact on the historic or architectural character of the area, the use of standard corporate designs and signage may not be acceptable.
  • A comprehensive landscaping scheme prepared by a fully qualified landscape architect.
  • Any retailing component shall not exceed 100 sq.m. of retailing area and shall be restricted to convenience goods only. Where permission is sought for a retail floorspace in excess of 100sq.m, the sequential approach to retail development shall apply.
  • Forecourt lighting, including canopy lighting, should be limited where possible. All external lighting shall be cowled and diverted away from the public roadway to prevent a traffic hazard.
  • The placing of signs on footpaths, grass verges or any part of a public roadway will not be permitted. No advertisements or other structures, whether temporary or permanent, shall be placed on the forecourt which would interfere with the sight lines of motorists entering / egressing the site.
  • EV Charging points for electric cars shall be provided with every new/extended service station.
  • the provision of HGV facilities, where appropriate.

11.6.6 Retail Warehousing

The Retail Strategy has outlined that there is limited current need for additional floorspace of this type within the County. A very cautious approach will therefore be taken regarding further such development over the period of the Plan, (please refer to Chapter 4 Economy Strategy and Retail Strategy contained in Appendix 4 for further details), other then completion of existing parks and areas identified in Volume 2.

Any retail warehousing development shall be restricted to ‘bulky goods’ or goods which are not easily portable by customers travelling by foot, bicycle, or bus (See Annex 1 of Retail Planning Guidelines 2012 for definitions of bulky goods), otherwise these developments could have a damaging material impact on the commercial viability of town centres. Ancillary products should not exceed 20% of the total net retail floorspace of the relevant retail unit.

DM OBJ 59:         To ensure that retail warehousing is only permissible on lands identified    in Volume 2 of this Development Plan. All planning applications for retail warehousing shall set out clearly in the planning documentation how the proposal complies with the Retail Planning Guidelines 2012, this Development Plan and the Retail Strategy.

DM OBJ 60:         Any retail warehousing development shall be restricted to ‘bulky goods’ as defined by Annex 1 of Retail Planning Guidelines (2012). Ancillary products shall not exceed 20% of the total net retail floorspace of the relevant retail unit.

11.6.7 Industrial, Office, Warehousing and Business Park Development

Building on the momentum of the successful implementation of the Meath Economic Strategy and having regard to the need identified in the RSES to address the disconnect experienced most acutely in the Mid-East Region between where people live and work the Council is setting out an ambitious programme for the delivery of a wider spread of economic growth throughout the County. Support structures are in place in the Council to encourage the development of quality enterprise development.

The Development Plan identifies a range of lands to accommodate various employment uses. It is intended that these areas will develop as high quality, sustainable working environments which will attract further investment. Therefore, the Development Plan places significant emphasis on ensuring development proposals are of high design quality, suitably landscaped, provide good facilities for pedestrians and cyclists and include staff facilities. The choice of coloured cladding used should be most suitable to Ireland’s natural landscape. The development of high-quality employment development is a critical component to releasing and supporting the ‘live work’ community concept.

This section should be considered in conjunction with Chapter 4 Economy and Employment while Section 9 sets out the applicable parking standards for these developments.

DM OBJ 61           Any planning application for industrial, office, warehousing and Business Park Development shall address the following development assessment criteria:

  • To require innovative contemporary designs for new industrial, office, warehousing and business park developments.
  • External finishes shall be suitable for the local/natural landscape
  • That indicative site coverage for industrial/commercial development on greenfield sites is 50% coverage unless the design characteristics of the scheme, proposed uses and mobility management plan indicate support for higher site coverage.
  • In town centre locations, in order to encourage and facilitate the development of a compact town centre, and to achieve desirable massing and heights of buildings, plot ratio and site coverage of 1.5 and 70% respectively will generally be the norm.
  • To require that full details of the proposed use(s), including industrial processes involved are provided.
  • To require that full details of the hours of operation be provided.
  • To require that details of suitable access arrangements, internal roads layout including details of footpaths, turning areas, loading bays be provided.
  • Boundaries which are visible from the public road should be of a high architectural quality. Palisade fencing to the front of any building line shall not be permitted.
  • The use of retention ponds as an urban design feature within business parks will be encouraged to enhance the setting, subject to compliance with all relevant safety requirements.
  • To require that proposals for and location of onsite areas for storage and disposal (if applicable) of waste be provided as part of any planning application. All external storage including bin storage, oil tanks, etc, shall be visually screened from public areas.
  • To require that waste and recycling areas be covered, screened and enclosed from public view and wind, compliant with the Council’s Waste Management Strategy.
  • All overground oil, chemical storage tanks should be adequately bunded to protect against spillage.
  • To require that a survey of any existing vegetation onsite and a suitable landscaping scheme prepared by an appropriately qualified professional, taking account of same, be submitted as part of any planning application to enhance the development.
  • Open space shall be provided in suitable locations as part of the development in order to enhance the development and provide amenity and passive recreation for future employees.
  • To require that all significant Industrial, Office, Warehousing and Business Park Development incorporate works of public art in the form of outdoor sculptures, special architectural and landscape features or other appropriate art work in the development.
  • To require that all planning applications for Industrial, Office, Warehousing and Business Park Development on sites in excess of 0.5 hectares are accompanied by a Construction Environmental Management Plan (CEMP).
  • To require that all new developments with over 100 employees shall have a Mobility Management Plan.
  • To encourage the provision of supporting facilities for employees including childcare facilities, leisure uses and coffee shops in business parks.
  • To encourage research and development activities as an ancillary part of all new and existing business parks in the County in conjunction with 3rd level Institutions.

11.6.8 Agricultural Buildings & Structures

The design, scale, siting and layout of agricultural buildings should respect, and where possible, enhance the rural environment, (Refer to Chapter 9 Rural Development for further information.)

DM OBJ 62        All applications for agricultural buildings and structures shall address the following criteria as part of a planning application;

  • To require that buildings are sited appropriately in order to minimise obtrusion on the landscape, having regard to the Landscape Character Assessment contained in Appendix 5.
  • The use of dark coloured cladding, for example dark browns, greys, greens and reds are most suitable for farm buildings, and roof areas should be darker than walls.
  • Developments shall comply with the European Union (Good Agricultural Practice for Protection of Waters) (Amendment) Regulations 2014, (GAP Regs 2014).
  • All planning applications for agricultural development shall be accompanied by comprehensive details of all land holdings and herd number(s), if applicable.
  • All new and existing agricultural developments will be required to contain sufficient detail which demonstrates that all effluent, including yard run-off, is collected and stored within the confines of the development.
  • In the case of new farm enterprises, a clear evidence base must be provided which demonstrates the need for the proposal and details of how any buildings proposed form part of a comprehensive business plan for the farm holding supported by Teagasc.

11.6.9 Extractive Industry

The Council recognises the contribution of the extractive industry in supporting jobs in the construction and aggregates section of the County. (Please refer to Chapter 9 Rural Development Strategy for grounding policies and objectives regarding extractive industries).

DM POL 22:      To encourage the rehabilitation of disused pits and quarries to productive agricultural use where appropriate having regard to all appropriate environmental considerations.

DM OBJ 63:         Where possible, sites shall be subject to rehabilitation and landscaping programmes in tandem with the various phases of extraction. Possible uses post closure could include agriculture and recreation/amenities.

DM OBJ 64           All applications for extractive industry development shall comprehensively address the following criteria as part of a pre-application discussion and/or planning application proposal:

  • Impact   on   Natura   2000   sites, NHAs,   sites   of   ecological   importance,   geological    or geomorphological heritage features; (Refer to Chapter 8 Cultural Heritage for further information);
  • Impact on groundwater, surface water and important aquifers and compliance with the objectives of the Water Framework Directive (Refer to chapter 7 for further information on Water Framework Directive);
  • Effective control of emissions and dust
  • Phasing programme for extraction and rehabilitation;
  • A scheme of rehabilitation and after care for the site upon abandonment / exhaustion of resource. Details to be submitted should include plan and section drawings, detailing the following:
  • Anticipated finished landform and surface/landscape treatments (both of each phase and the whole excavation),
  • Quality and condition of topsoil and overburden,
  • Rehabilitation works proposed,
  • Type and location of any vegetation proposed,
  • Proposed method of funding and delivery of  restoration/reinstatement works etc. Please    note that provision for sinking funds under the control of the Council may be conditioned to ensure satisfactory reinstatement on completion of extraction, if considered appropriate.
  • A planning application shall include a Planning Report which details the planning status and planning history of the quarry.
  • Visual impact of the development, a detailed landscape and visual assessment prepared by a suitably qualified professional (Refer to Volume 3 Book of Maps for Views and Prospects, Appendix 5 Landscape Character Assessment, Appendix 6 Record of Protected Structures, Appendix 10 Protected Views and Prospects for further information.);
  • Impact on existing local communities with regard to but not limited to noise, vibration and subsidence;
  • Contents of the ‘Archaeological Code of Practice’ (Department of the Environment, Heritage and Local Government and Irish Concrete Federation, 2009);
  • The extent of land ownership, nature of the deposits and details of any ancillary processes (such as crushing, concrete manufacture, etc);
  • Proposals for surface water management and flood risk minimisation;
  • Transportation impacts with particular reference to details of all haul routes, trip movements    etc (A special contribution may be attached to a grant of permission in accordance with Section 48 of the Planning and Development Act, as amended).

11.6.10 Land reclamation

The Council recognises the need for land reclamation for the improvement of agricultural lands. It is also of note that in recent years significant pressure has come on the Council to facilitate the provision of waste recovery sites for soil and stone.

DM POL 23:         To require that all land reclamation developments which include the importation of any material onto site have the requisite waste authorisation is in place in accordance with the stipulations of the Waste Management Act 1996.

DM OBJ 65           All applications for land reclamation / soil and stone recovery shall comprehensively address the following criteria as part of a pre-application discussion and/or planning application proposal:

  • Impact on groundwater, surface water and important aquifers and compliance with the objectives of the Water Framework Directive (Refer to chapter 7 for further information on Water Framework Directive);
  • Impact on Natura 2000 sites, NHAs, sites of ecological importance, geological or geomorphological heritage features; (Refer to Chapter 8 Cultural Heritage for further information);
  • Details of the overall and annual quantities of material to be brought on to the site in tonnes having regard to Mandatory EIA Thresholds set out in Schedule 5 Part 2 of the Planning and Development Regulations 2001 as amended;
  • Details of the nature of material including EWC or LoW codes for all waste materials proposed for acceptance at the site;
  • Justification for agricultural improvement and detail of proposed agricultural use;
  • Transportation impacts with particular reference to details of all haul routes, Load size, Trip movements (A special contribution may be attached to a grant of permission in accordance with Section 48 of the Planning and Development Act, as amended);
  • Details of site services including wheel wash, site office, security welfare facilities quarantine areas and weighbridges;
  • Phasing programme for reclamation with accurate drawings showing the development in layout and sections through the phases to completion;
  • Impact on existing local communities with regard to but not limited to noise, dust, emissions

Section 7 – Community Development Standards


11.7.1 Community Development

11.7.2 Sheltered Accommodation/Step Down Housing, Residential Care Homes, Retirement Homes, Nursing Homes, Retirement Villages

The Council recognises that the provision of care for the elderly and other vulnerable people in our community is an essential requirement particularly in the context of changing national demographics. A range of accommodation options fall within this sector including: step down housing which supports independent living as support services are available in a complex arrangement, nursing homes, retirement homes etc. (Please refer to Chapter 7 Community Building for further details).

Nursing homes, residential and retirement homes and retirement villages should be located in towns and villages for reasons of sustainability, accessibility and proximity to services.

There is a presumption against this type of development in the open countryside for reasons relating to sustainability, poor accessibility and lack of public transport, social exclusion and isolation.

DM POL 24:      Require that residential care homes, retirement homes, nursing homes,   retirement villages and sheltered accommodation/step down housing be located in towns and villages for reasons of sustainability, accessibility, social inclusion, and proximity to the availability of services, except where a demonstrated need to locate in a rural environment because of the nature of the care required can be clearly established

DM OBJ 66        Reduced open space standards may be acceptable for the  following development types: residential care homes, retirement homes, nursing homes, retirement villages and sheltered accommodation only in cases where it is clearly demonstrated with a supporting evidence base that it is appropriate by having regard to the specific open space needs of residents and only where suitable accessible public open space is available as part of the development.

DM OBJ 67       Planning applications for the change of use of a residential dwelling or other building to nursing home, residential care home, or for the construction of new residential care homes, retirement homes, nursing homes, retirement villages or sheltered accommodation/step down housing, shall be assessed for compliance with the following criteria:

  • The Health Act 2007 (Care and Welfare of Residents in Designated Centres for Older People) (Amendment) Regulations 2010 (or any such other relevant standards and legislation that may be enacted);
  • The National Quality Standards for Residential Care Settings for Older People in Ireland, 2009;
  • Sustainability, is the location served by good public transport links, pedestrian and cycle facilities close to local services and facilities;
  • Suitability of the size and scale of the proposal having regard to the site constraints and the area in which it is located;
  • The degree to which the residential amenity of surrounding properties is protected;
  • The requirement for a high standard of design and external finishes;
  • The adequacy of off street car parking;
  • High quality open space proposals with comprehensive landscaping plans prepared by a fully qualified landscape professional;
  • Availability of services.

11.7.3 Childcare

There is a continuing demand for suitable high-quality childcare facilities in the County, (Refer to Chapter 7 Community Building for the grounding policies in respect of childcare development). 

Applicants are encouraged to seek the advice and support of the County’s Childcare Committee, Tulsa, HSE and other relevant bodies in the design and layout of proposed childcare facilities prior to the submission of a planning application.

DM POL 25:        To facilitate the provision of childcare facilities in appropriate locations as set out in

in accordance with the provisions of the DoEHLG ‘Childcare Facilities Guidelines for Planning Authorities’ (2001).

DM POL 26:        Development of childcare facilities at the following locations will normally be encouraged;

  • Areas of concentrated employment and business parks
  • Within new and existing residential developments;
  • Neighbourhood Centres
  • Large retail developments
  • Schools or major educational facilities
  • Adjacent to public transportation, and
  • Villages and Rural Nodes

DM OBJ 68           Planning applications for childcare facilities shall be assessed for compliance with the following criteria:

  • Suitability of the site for the type and size of facility proposed.
  • Impact on residential amenity of surrounding residential development;
  • Adequate availability of indoor and outdoor play space;
  • Convenience to public transport nodes, pedestrian and cycling facilities;
  • Local traffic conditions;
  • Safe access and sufficient convenient off-street car parking and/or suitable drop-off and collection points for customers and staff;
  • Number of such facilities in the area. In this regard, the applicant shall submit a map showing the locations of childcare facilities within the vicinity of the subject site and demonstrate the need for an additional facility at that location;

DM OBJ 69       All applications for childcare facilities shall comprehensively set out the following as part of a pre-application discussion and/or planning application proposal:

  • The type of childcare facility proposed – Full day care; sessional service including playgroups, preschools and Montessori; Child minding;
  • No. of children;
  • No. of employees;
  • Proposed hours of operation;
  • Car-parking provision; (please refer to Section 11.9.1)
  • Location of secure external play area including secure site boundaries.

DM OBJ 70          In the case of proposals within an existing dwelling the Council will consider whether there is sufficient private open space remaining for the enjoyment of the occupant of the dwelling. The potential impact on the residential amenities of adjoining residences will also be considered. In such cases a significant residential component shall be retained.

11.7.4 Education

The Council will be guided by the Department of Education and Skills as to the need for new educational facilities or expansion of facilities at existing schools (Please refer to Chapter 7 Community Building for grounding policies in respect of educational facilities).

All sites for schools shall comply with the requirements of the following:

  • ‘The Provision of Schools and the Planning System A Code of Practice for Planning Authorities’, 2008, or any update thereof;
  • Technical guidance document TGD025 (or any such updated document) in respect of primary schools;
  • Technical guidance document TGD 027 (or any such updated document) in respect of post primary schools.

DM OBJ 71           Assessing planning applications for new schools and/or redevelopment/extensions of existing schools, the Planning Authority will have regard to the following:

  • Site location, proximity of school to catchment area, size of site relative to outdoor space requirements and the future needs of the school (i.e. sufficient space provided for future expansion).
  • Public transport availability.
  • Traffic and transport impact, good, safe accessible pedestrian and cyclist routes to and from the school from nearby residential and commercial areas.
  • Provision of safe and adequate set down etc facilities for buses.
  • Provision of adequate, secure, covered cycle facilities.
  • Provision of safe access and adequate car parking and set down areas to facilitate drop off/pick up
  • Adequate signage, lighting and boundary treatments.
  • Impact on local amenities and out of school hours uses.

DM OBJ 72:          Temporary classrooms will be assessed on a case-by-case basis and will generally be accepted for a temporary period not exceeding five years and such classrooms should not interfere with onsite car/cycle parking spaces or unduly impact the usability of outdoor play/sports facilities. Any such proposal shall be accompanied by a timeline for the construction of permanent facilities.

DM OBJ 73:         Dual function of sports facilities/halls etc, outside of school hours will be encouraged where the use of such facilities will be of a benefit to the wider community, however, any outside hours usage of the school should not be to the detriment of adjoining residential amenities.

DM OBJ 74:         To require that all planning applications for new schools are accompanied by a Mobility Management Plan. Existing schools seeking permission to expand will also be required to provide a Mobility Management Plan.

11.7.5 Places of Worship

The pattern of religious practice is becoming increasingly diverse in County Meath arising in part from the significant in migration into the County. This Development Plan supports proposals for the regular use of a building as a place of worship or religious instruction in the context of the land use zoning of the site and the amenities of the area.

DM OBJ 75:         To require that details in relation to the capacity of the facility (seating capacity), hours of operation and a traffic assessment (including details of the proposed parking provision) accompany any pre application discussion and/or planning application proposal.

11.7.6 Allotments

All proposals for allotment development shall be assessed against the following criteria;

  • Site location - the suitability of the site comparable to the location of the population served;
  • sites in or at the edge of the settlements are more preferable;
  • The adequacy of the public road network serving the site and car parking provision; and,
  • The adequacy of water supplies

Section 8 – Energy Development Standards
 

11.8.1 Energy Development

The Council encourages and facilitates early pre-application discussions on these projects.

Refer to Chapter, 6 Infrastructure which contains the grounding policies and objectives relevant to energy related development.

Refer to Section 11.2.5, Strategic Infrastructure Development as the proposal may fall within a category of development which constitutes SID.

DM POL 27:      To encourage renewable development proposals which contribute positively to reducing energy consumption and carbon footprint.

DM OBJ 76       In the assessment of individual energy development proposals, the Council will take the following criteria into account:

  • The proper planning and sustainable development of the area;
  • The environmental and social impacts of the proposed development;
  • Traffic impacts including details of haul routes;
  • Impact of the development on the landscape, (please refer to Appendix 5 Landscape Character Assessment) ;
  • Impact on protected Views and Prospects, (please refer to Appendix 10 Protected Views and Prospects);
  • Impact on public rights of way and walking routes, (please refer to Appendix 12 Public Rights of Way) ;
  • Connection to the National Grid (where applicable);
  • Mitigation features, where impacts are inevitable;
  • Protected of designated areas - NHAs, SPAs and SACs, areas of archaeological potential and scenic importance,
  • proximity to structures that are listed for protection, national monuments, etc. (Please refer to Chapter 8 Cultural Heritage, Natural Heritage, Landscape and Green Infrastructure and Appendices 6-9 inclusive for further details);
  • Cumulative Impact of proposal.

11.8.2 Solar Energy

There are a variety of solar technologies available in the form of roof-top domestic, roof-top commercial, large-scale land based solar developments (where solar cells are mounted to supply energy to  the  grid) and solar energy storage facilities. There are a significant number of solar farm planning applications in the system nationally. Section 28 Guidance is awaited from the Department of Housing and Planning to assist in the assessment of this development type.

DM OBJ 77           In the assessment of individual proposals, the Council will require the following to be submitted as part of any planning application:

  • Glint & Glare Assessment
  • Outline Construction Environmental Management Plan (CEMP)
  • Biodiversity Management Plan
  • Public Consultation details
  • Noise Assessment
  • Socio-Economic Assessment
  • EIA Screening
  • Ecology Assessment
  • Archaeology Assessment
  • Traffic & Transport Assessment
  • Landscape and Visual Assessment
  • Hydrology Appraisal/Flood Risk Assessment
  • Decommissioning/Restoration Plan

11.8.3 Wind Energy

The Council require that any pre-application discussion and/or planning application proposal for wind farm development sets out how the project complies with DM POL 27. The Council will support appropriate innovative designs for wind farms. Topographical enclosures and extensive areas of degraded or previously developed lands should be identified for wind farm development to help minimise visual impacts and to harmonise wind turbines with the landscape. In general, matt finishes and neutral colours for turbines and structures are required. All planning applications shall be accompanied by detailed proposals for the restoration of the site after removal of the turbines and associated infrastructure including access roads. Adequate financial security will be required to ensure site restoration and removal of the wind farm.

DM POL 28:         To require compliance with the Wind Energy Development Guidelines, (2006) and Circular PL20-13, and any updates thereof. Any proposal shall be supported by both a  technical and  an  environmental statement  prepared  to  an  acceptable standard which sets out how the proposal complies with the Guidelines.

DM OBJ 78:         To require that any pre-application discussion and/or planning application proposal for wind farm development sets out how the project complies with DM POL 28.

DM OBJ 79:         Topographical enclosures and extensive areas of degraded or previously developed lands should be identified for wind farm development to help minimise visual impacts and to harmonise wind turbines with the landscape.

DM OBJ 80:          In general, matt finishes and neutral colours for turbines and structures are required.

DM OBJ 81:          The Council will support appropriate innovative designs for wind farms.

DM OBJ 82:         All planning applications shall be accompanied by detailed proposals for the restoration of the site after removal of the turbines and associated infrastructure including access roads. Adequate financial security will be required to ensure site restoration and removal of the wind farm.

11.8.4 Energy Networks

In the assessment of individual proposals, the Council will take the criteria outlined in section 11.8.1 (Energy Development) into account.

11.8.5 Telecommunications and Broadband

High quality communications and information technology networks are critical for the continued implementation of the Economic Strategy. Please refer to Chapter 6 for grounding policies for telecommunications and broadband.

DM POL 29:      To require compliance with the requirements of the “Telecommunications Antennae and Support Structures – Guidelines for Planning Authorities” July 1996, except where they conflict with Circular Letter PL 07/12 which shall take precedence, and any subsequent revisions or expanded guidelines in this area.

DM OBJ 83:       Encourage the location of telecommunications structures at appropriate location within the County, subject to environmental considerations.

DM OBJ 84:       Require the co-location of antennae on existing support structures and where this is not feasible require documentary evidence as to the non-availability of this option in proposals for new structures.

DM OBJ 85:       To avoid the location of structures in sensitive landscapes, in nature conservation areas, in highly sensitive landscapes and where views are to be preserved. (Please refer to Chapter 8 Cultural Heritage, Natural Heritage, Landscape and Green Infrastructure and Appendices 6-9 inclusive for further details).

DM OBJ 86:       To generally discourage the use of wires or other devices affixed to the facade of buildings in town and village centres.

DM OBJ 87:       To encourage the development of open access networks in all developments.

11.8.6 Anaerobic Digesters

Anaerobic Digesters are widely used in the agricultural sector in the form of small on-farm digesters producing biogas to heat farmhouses and other farm buildings.

An Anaerobic Digestion plant typically comprises of:

  • a digester tank
  • buildings to house ancillary equipment such as a generator,
  • a biogas storage tank
  • a flare stack (3-10m in height)
  • associated pipework.

Plants can vary in scale from small schemes treating the waste from an individual farm through medium-sized centralised facilities dealing with wastes from several farms (potentially supplemented by crops such as maize grown specifically to feed the digester) to sizeable industrial AD plant handling large quantities of municipal solid waste. In the case of small plants it is likely that the plant can be accommodated within the vicinity of existing farm buildings. Some forms of biomass produce digestate and other end products which must be disposed of.

Siting is a key consideration when assessing proposals for Anaerobic Digesters. The development of a bio energy project regardless of scale has development implications on the environs in which it will be situated. The development impacts which may be exacerbated by an improperly sited bio energy project. Key considerations include:

  • Visual Impact;
  • External Finishes.
  • Sky lining.
  • Residential Amenity;
  • Transport;
  • Road Capacity o Site Entrance
  • Light Pollution;
  • Noise Pollution.
  • Air Pollution

DM OBJ 88:       To seek to facilitate the development of alternative energy sources where such proposals are  consistent  with  landscape preservation, the protection of natural habitats, the protection of visual and residential amenities and Development Plan policy and the principles of proper planning and sustainable development.

Section 9 – Parking Standards
 

11.9.1 Parking Standards

One of the cross-cutting themes of the Development Plan is to encourage a shift to more sustainable forms of transport. The provision of sufficient car parking is important particularly in areas of the County which are currently poorly served by public transport networks. Therefore, the rationale for the application of car parking standards is to ensure that consideration is given to the accommodation of vehicles in assessing development proposals while being mindful of the need to promote a shift towards more sustainable forms of transport.

DM OBJ 89:       Car parking shall be provided in accordance with Table 11.2 and associated guidance notes.

Table 11.2 Car Parking

Land Use – Residential

Car Spaces

Dwellings

2 per conventional dwelling

Flats/ Apartments (Refer to the Design Standards for New Apartments in relation to reduced car parking requirements for development adjacent to existing and future rail stations and minimum requirements in peripheral/or less accessible urban locations)

2 per unit

In all cases, 1 visitor space per 4 apartments

Hotel Accommodation (excluding bars, functions rooms, etc.)

1 per bedroom

B&B / Guesthouse

1 per bedroom

Hostel Accommodation

1 per bedroom or 1 per 10 beds

Self-Catering Accommodation Caravan/Mobile Home Parks

1 per unit

Institutions

1 per employee

Student Accommodation

To be determined on a case by case basis

Land Use – Employment

Manufacturing Industry

1 per 50 sq.m. gross floor area

Warehousing

1 per 100 sq.m. gross floor area

Offices

1 per 25 sq.m. gross floor area. Where the floor area exceeds 1,500 sq.m. gross floor area, 1 space per 50sq.m. gross floor area.

Data Centres

1 per 300 sq.m. gross floor area

Land Use – Commercial

Food Retail

1 per 20 sq.m. gross floor area. Where the floor area exceeds 1,000 sq.m. gross floor area, 1 space per 14 sq.m. gross floor area.

*Provision should be made for taxi drop off spaces.

Non Food Retail

1 per 20 sq.m. gross floor area.

Retail Warehousing

1 per 20 sq.m. gross floor area

Cash and Carry

1 per 50 sq.m. gross floor area

Banks

1 per 20 sq.m. gross floor area

Restaurants

1 per 5 sq.m dining area

Bars, Night Clubs, Lounges, Function Rooms incl. such spaces in hotels

1 per 4 sq.m. of public area

Vehicle Service Station

4 per fuel pump provided

Retail Outlets within Vehicle Service Garages

1 per 10 sq. m of net floor area.

1 HGV parking space per 30sq.m. net floor area is required where food is served on the premises.

Land Use - Health and Education Facilities

Hospitals

1 per bed

Surgeries

2 per consulting room

Nursing Homes

1 per 3 beds and one space per employee

Schools

3 per classroom plus dedicated pick up/set down area within site boundary

Colleges/Third Level Institutions

To be determined by the Planning Authority.

Land Use - Community Facilities

Places of Public Worship

1 per 4 seats

Libraries

1 per 20 sq.m. gross floor area

Cultural buildings

To be determined by the Planning Authority

Crèches

1 per employee & dedicated set down area and 1 per 4 children plus dedicated set down area

Cinemas/Theatre

1 per 3 seats. Where gross floor area exceeds 1000 sq.m., 1 space per 5 seats.

Funeral Homes

1 per 5 sq. m. gross floor area

Community Centres

1 per 5 sq. m. gross floor area

Allotments

1 space per plot

Land Use - Sports Facilities

Sport Clubs-including swimming pools, tennis courts, gyms, fitness studios, etc.

2 per court, 5 per 100 sq.m.

Golf / Pitch & Putt courses

3 per hole

Golf Driving Ranges

1 per 2m of base line/per trap whichever is less

Bowling Alleys

5 per lane

Stadia

To be determined by the Planning Authority

Playing fields

15 spaces per pitch

Guidance Notes

  • Where parking is permitted in the view of the general public, adequate soft landscaping shall be provided to soften the appearance of hard surfaced areas;
  • Parking areas shall be reserved solely for the parking of vehicles and should not be used for the storage of materials or goods associated with the development, nor for the parking of goods or other heavy vehicles;
  • The standards set out in Table 11.2 shall apply to all new developments, be it new construction or a new extension or a material change of use of existing buildings.
  • The Council will encourage and facilitate innovative design solutions for medium to high density residential schemes where substantial compliance with normal development management considerations can be demonstrated (Refer to DM OBJ 12).
  • Accessible car parking spaces shall be provided at a minimum rate of 5% of the total number of spaces, for developments requiring more than 10 car parking spaces, with the minimum provision being one space (unless the nature of the development requires otherwise). Such spaces shall be proximate to the entry points of buildings and comply with the requirements of the Building Regulations.
  • Age Friendly car parking spaces should generally be provided, where possible, in all developments.
  • In the case of any specific uses not listed in the above table, the Council will specify its requirements in relation to parking.
  • The above car parking standards shall be applied at the discretion of the Council in the County’s rural towns and villages having regard to the availability and adequacy of on street parking, existing or proposed off street parking to serve the development and the status of the town/village within the settlement hierarchy of the County.
  • Residential car parking can be reduced at the discretion of the Council, where development is proposed in areas with good access to services and strong public transport links.
  • Non-residential car parking standards are set down as “maxima” standards.
  • Adequate car parking bays should be provided within the confines of the public areas of residential areas to address public needs.
  • All parking areas shall be clearly demarcated and numbered with indelible paint which shall be permanently maintained to the satisfaction of the Planning Authority.

DM OBJ 90:     The dimension of parking bays shall comply with Table 11.3.

Table 11.3 Car Parking Bays

Parking dimensions(Perpendicular to Kerb)

Where space is adjacent to a wall or other obstruction

5.0m x 2.5m

5.0m x 2.75m

Parking dimensions (Parallel to Kerb)

6.0m x 2.5m

Accessible Parking Bay to comply with Building Regulations.

5.0m x 2.5m + 1.2m to the sides and rear of each space

Loading Bay

6.0m x 3.0m

Circulation Aisles

6.0m in width

DM OBJ 91:      Car parking provision shall normally be provided within the curtilage of the development site. Where, in the opinion of the Council, it would be impracticable for individual developers to provide for on-site parking, a contribution may be required.

DM OBJ 92:       Loading bays shall be located and designed to prevent any obstructions to traffic circulation and to accommodate vehicular manoeuvring on site.

DM OBJ 93:       New residential development should take account of the following regarding car parking:

  • Vehicular parking for detached and semi-detached housing should be within the curtilage of the house;
  • Vehicular parking for apartments, where appropriate, should generally be at basement level. Where this is not possible, parking for apartments and terraced housing should be in small scale informal groups overlooked by residential units;
  • The visual impact of large areas of parking should be reduced by the use of screen planting, low walls and the use of different textured or coloured paving for car parking bays;
  • Consideration needs to be given to parking for visitors and people with disabilities; and,
  • Provision of EV Charging points.

11.9.2 EV Charging Points

The Climate Action Plan, 2019 acknowledges that the pricing structure for EV vehicles is a major factor in consumers decision making. However the Plan also acknowledges the importance of ‘ensuring the  EV  Charging  network  underpins  public  confidence.’    The  Council  will  encourage  the provision of EV charging points in all developments for future proofing.

DM OBJ 94:       All car parks shall include the provision of necessary wiring and ducting to be capable of accommodating future Electric Vehicle charging points, at a rate of 10% of total space numbers.

DM OBJ 95:       In any car park in excess of 20 spaces where public access is available, one fully functional charging point for Electric Vehicles shall be provided in accordance with IEC 61851 Standard for Electric Vehicle Conductive Charging Systems.

11.9.3 Cycling Parking

The Council will require an appropriate amount of cycle parking facilities to be provided with new development.

DM OBJ 96:       To require the provision of cycle parking facilities in accordance with the  Design Standards  for  New  Apartments  (March 2018)  and  Table 11.4 Cycle Parking Standards.

DM OBJ 97:      Cycle parking facilities shall be conveniently located, secure, easy to use, adequately lit and well sign posted. All long-term (more than three hours) cycle racks shall be protected from the weather.

DM OBJ 98:       To establish and implement Cycle Parking Standards for new developments in the County.

DM OBJ 99:       In residential developments without private gardens or wholly dependent on balconies for private open space, covered secure bicycle stands should be provided in private communal areas;

DM OBJ 100:     All cycle facilities in multi-storey car parks shall be at ground floor level and segregated from vehicle traffic. Cyclists shall also have designated entry and exit routes at car parks.

Table 11.4 Cycle Parking Standards

Type of Development

Cycle Parking Standard

Apartments

1 private secure bicycle space per bed space (note – design should not require bicycle access via living area), minimum 2 spaces

1 visitor bicycle space per two housing units

Shops

1 space for every 10 car spaces or 1 space per till/checkout, whichever is greater

 

Offices

10% of employee numbers subject to minimum of 10 bicycle places or one bike space for every car space, whichever is the greatest.

Schools (Rural schools
will be assessed on
a case by case basis)

25% of pupil registration numbers/minimum of 10 spaces. Consider separate teacher/employee parking.

Other developments

1 bike space per car space, or 10% of employee numbers in general

Off Street car parks
(including Multi-Storey Car Parks)

Park and Ride locations

10% of total car spaces/minimum provision of 50 spaces


Consider sheltered parking at P+R

On-street (public)

Minimum  of  5-10 spaces depending on expected level of usage 

     

Public Transport pick up points/interchanges

2.5% of number of daily boarders at that point/station, minimum of 10 bicycle spaces

Events

5% of forecast attendees

11.9.4 Taxi Services

Accessible taxi services are important in providing a demand responsive 24-hour door-to-door service.

DM OBJ 101:       Planning applications for significant commercial, industrial and other developments shall demonstrate the provision of adequate drop-off and  set-down areas for taxi services.

DM OBJ 102:     To require the provision of facilities for taxis in all new supermarket and neighbourhood development proposals.

Section 10 – Advertising Standards
 

11.10.1 Advertising

Advertising structures are an accepted and necessary part of commercial activity and are essential for way finding.

DM POL 30:      To permit only advertisements which enhance the appearance and vitality of an  area and make a positive contribution to the streetscape.

DM OBJ 103:    The following signage types will be discouraged

  • Signs which advertise general products or services
  • Animated, moving, flashing, rotating or sound-emitting signs
  • Billboards
  • Roof mounted signs or signs which project above the ridge height of the building
  • Internally illuminated awnings
  • Changeable message signs
  • Pole mounted signs
  • Wall signs
  • Free standing signs

DM OBJ 104:       In assessing advertising signage, the Council will consider the following criteria:

  • The size and scale of signs which should not conflict with existing structures in the vicinity.
  • The potential impacts on the streetscape of the proposal
  • Large  scale  commercial  advertisement  structures  are  not  acceptable  on  or       near  Protected Structures, Architectural Conservation Areas (please refer to Map 8.3), in public parks and in areas of high amenity.
  • Signs should not interfere with windows or other façade features or project above the skyline.

DM OBJ 105:       Advertisement structures will not be permitted where they give rise to a potential traffic hazard. In accordance with the Spatial Planning and National Roads and the Guidelines on the provision of Tourism and Leisure Signage on National Roads (2011), advertisement structures will not be permitted at roundabouts, at traffic signalised junctions, at locations where they obstruct sight lines, compete with other traffic signs, give rise to confusion for road users or endanger traffic safety.

DM OBJ 106:       Applications for advertisement structures along national routes and along approach roads to towns and villages will generally not be permitted except for tourist attractions of national or regional importance which utilise the approved designated signage.

DM OBJ 107:       The number of advertisement structures for any one premises shall be kept to a minimum and will generally be restricted to a maximum of two in the local area. In exceptional cases this maximum may be exceeded at the discretion of the Council.

DM OBJ 108:       The use of electronic variable messaging signs commonly known as “VMS signs”, shall be reserved strictly for use in roadwork activities, hazard information and or as part of an approved event traffic management plan. Advanced written consent of the Council will be required prior to installation and usage of such signage.

DM OBJ 109:       In urban centres where public realm strategies have been prepared the Council reserve the right to de-exempt any signage in the interests of visual amenity in these areas.

11.10.2 Advertising Hoardings

Advertising hoardings, including tri-vision and three-dimensional signs, if inappropriately located can constitute one of the most obtrusive elements of all forms of outdoor advertisement. They rely for their impact on size, scale and location and are thus usually detrimental to the character of the area in which they are situated and, in some cases, contribute to a traffic hazard. However, they can help to screen derelict or obsolete sites awaiting re-development, in certain circumstances.

The practice of parking trailers or other mobile objects bearing advertisements in fields adjoining roads has become a feature of Irish roads over the past number of years. Such advertisements can be harmful to the visual amenities of the area, represent a traffic hazard by virtue of distracting motorists and could have impacts on biodiversity. Where such advertisements do not have the benefit of planning permission, the Council shall take appropriate enforcement action. The potential negative impacts of such development shall also be taken into account in assessing applications for such development.

DM OBJ 110:     Outdoor advertising hoardings shall not be permitted where it would detract from the visual quality of the setting of Protected Structures. In all other cases, planning applications for such development will be considered on the basis of the visual impact of the proposed advertising hoarding and the potential for a traffic hazard arising from same will be imperative. The number and scale of hoardings in the vicinity of the site will be a material consideration.

Section 11 – Development Contributions
 

11.11.1 Development Contributions

Section 48 of the Planning and Development Act 2000 (as amended) allows the Planning Authority when granting planning permission to include conditions requiring the payment of a financial contribution in respect of public infrastructure and facilities benefitting development in the area of the planning authority and that is provided, or that it is intended will be provided, by or on behalf of a local authority. The current Meath County Development Contributions Scheme 2016 – 2021 (as amended) sets out the contributions applicable to development, the scheme should be consulted in advance of the making of a planning application. There are three type of development contributions; General, Special and Supplementary.

11.11.2 General Development Contribution

These contributions apply in respect of public infrastructure and facilities provided by or on behalf of the Planning Authority that benefit development in its functional area, as noted above. Section 48 (1) of the Act outlines that a Planning Authority when making a grant of permission, may include a condition requiring the payment of a contribution in respect of public infrastructure and facilities such as open spaces, community and recreational facilities and amenities and landscaping works; infrastructure to facilitate public transport, cycle and pedestrian facilities; refurbishment, upgrading, enlargement or replacement of roads and surface water drainage infrastructure.

11.11.3 Special Development Contributions

In circumstances where additional specific infrastructure for an area is required, the Council may attach a special contribution.

Developers may also be required to carry out works at their own expense to facilitate their development and this would be specified as a condition of the planning permission.

11.11.4 Supplementary Development Contributions

Under Section 49 of the Act, a Planning Authority may, when granting permission include conditions requiring the payment of a contribution in respect of any public infrastructure service or project specified in a “Supplementary Development Contribution Scheme” that will benefit the development to which the planning permission relates.

The Council has adopted Supplementary Development Contribution Schemes for the following projects;

  • Navan- Dublin Rail Line
  • Kells Backlands.

These schemes remain active. The Council will consider the need for additional contribution schemes over the plan period.

Section 12 – Dublin Airport Noise Zones


11.12.1 Development in Proximity to Approach Zones/Noise Zones of Airports and Airfields

Public Safety Zones, Approach zones of Dublin Airports, and noise zones associated with airport flight operations are illustrated on Map 5.4.1 & 5.4.2. In the assessment of development within these zones, regard shall be had to the relevant policy documents, implications of same and consultation shall take place with the relevant authorities. Please refer to Chapter 5 Movement for further detail.

DM POL 31:          To manage noise sensitive development in Noise Zone B and Noise Zone C, where aircraft noise may give rise to annoyance and sleep disturbance, and to ensure, where appropriate, noise insulation is incorporated within the development.  

DM POL 32:

  1. To require that single residential units (urban and rural) or extensions to same are provided with noise insulation of an appropriate standard having regard to its location within a Noise Zone B or Noise Zone C.
  2. To require non-residential noise sensitive uses or multiple residential developments within Noise B or Noise Zone C to include where appropriate, a noise impact assessment which clearly demonstrates that relevant internal noise guidelines will be met in order to protect the amenity of future occupants.

DM OBJ 111:       Development should be restricted which would give rise to conflicts with aircraft movements on environmental or safety grounds on lands in the vicinity of Dublin Airport and on the main flight paths serving Dublin Airport.

Section 13 – Seveso Sites
 

11.13.1 Seveso Sites

The Seveso III Directive, 2012/18/EU came into force in Ireland on 1st June 2015 replacing the Seveso II Directive, 96/82/EC. The Seveso III (Directive 2012/18/EU) was adopted taking into account, amongst other factors, the changes in EU legislation on the classification of chemicals and the increased rights for the public to access information and justice.

This Directive is aimed at the prevention of major accidents involving dangerous substances. However, as accidents may nevertheless occur, it also aims at limiting the consequences of such accidents not only for human health but also for the environment.

The Directive covers establishments where dangerous substances may be present (e.g. during processing or storage) in quantities above a certain threshold. Excluded from the Directive are certain industrial activities which are subject to other legislation providing a similar level of protection (e.g. nuclear establishments or the transport of dangerous substances).

Depending on the amount of dangerous substances present, establishments are categorised in lower and upper tier establishments, the latter are subject to more stringent requirements.

The Chemicals Act (Control of Major Accident Hazards involving Dangerous Substances) Regulations 2015 (S.I. No. 209 of 2015) (the “COMAH Regulations”), implement the Seveso III Directive (2012/18/EU). The purpose of the COMAH Regulations is to lay down rules for the prevention of major accidents involving dangerous substances, and to seek to limit as far as possible the consequences for human health and the environment of such accidents, with the overall objective of providing a high level of protection in a consistent and effective manner.

The intention is to achieve this through tiered controls on the operators of the establishments subject to the Regulations - the larger the quantities of dangerous substances present at an establishment, the more onerous the duties on the operator.

The European Communities (Control of Major Accident Hazards Involving Dangerous Substances) Regulations 2006 and the European Union (Control of Major Accident Hazards Involving Dangerous Substances) (Amendment) Regulations 2013, which implemented the Seveso II Directive (96/82/EC), have been revoked by the European Union (Control of Major Accident Hazards Involving Dangerous Substances)(Revocation) Regulations 2015 (S.I. No. 208 of 2015) and replaced by the COMAH Regulations.

Part 7 of the COMAH regulations 2015 provides that appropriate consultation procedures must be put in place to ensure that before decisions are taken, technical advice is available to Planning Authorities in respect of:

  1. the siting and development of new establishments;
  2. modifications to establishments of the type described in Regulation 12(1);
  3. new developments including transport routes, locations of public use and residential areas in the vicinity of establishments, where the siting, modifications or developments may be the source of, or increase the risk or consequences of, a major accident;

Such technical advice will be taken into account in the consideration of applications for planning permission.

The Central Competent Authority in the case of planning advice is the Health and Safety Authority (“HAS”). The HSA are also obliged to provide the Planning Authority with information to assist in the long-term planning of the County in order to:

  1. to maintain appropriate safety distances between establishments covered by these Regulations and residential areas, buildings and areas of public use, recreational areas, and, as far as possible, major transport routes;
  2. to protect areas of particular natural sensitivity or interest in the vicinity of establishments, where appropriate, through appropriate safety distances or other relevant measures; and;
  3. for the operator to take additional technical measures, in the case of existing establishments, in accordance with Regulation 7, so as not to increase the risks to human health and the environment.

Table 11.5: List of Seveso Sites in County Meath or Sites where Consultation Distances extend into the County, these are illustrated on Map 11.1.

Map 11.1

Name of Company

Seveso Location

Seveso Tier

Consultation Radius Distance from Facility

County

Site 1

Boliden  Tara Mines DAC

Knockumber  Road, Navan, Co. Meath

Upper Tier

1,000 metres

Meath

Site 2

Xtratherm Limited

Liscarton Industrial Estate, Kells Road, Navan

Lower Tier Site

1000 metres

Meath

Site 3

Grassland Fertilizers Limited

The Pound Slane Road  

Lower Tier Site

700 metres

Meath

Site 4

Flogas Ire. Ltd

Marsh Drogheda Road  

Upper Tier Site

600 metres

Louth

Site 5

Irish Industrial Explosives Limited

Clonagh, Enfield

Upper Tier Site

1000 metres

Kildare

Site 6

Clarochem Ireland Ltd

Damastown, Mullhuddart

Lower Tier Site

1000 metres

Fingal

Site 7

Chemco (Ireland) Limited (t/a Chemsource Logistics)

Macetown North Damastown Industrial Estate, Mulhuddart

 

Upper   Tier Site

1,000 metres

Fingal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Site 8

Aestellas Ireland Co. Ltd

Damastown Industrial Mullhuddart Park

 

 

Lower Tier Site

1,000 metres

Fingal

Site 9

Guerbet Ireland ULC

Damastown Industrial Mullhuddart Estate

 

 

Upper Tier Site

1,000 metres

Fingal

At present there are 3 no. Seveso III sites in the County. In addition, there are 6 no. Seveso III sites in neighbouring counties Louth, Fingal and Kildare where the ‘Seveso Consultation Distance’ extends into the County or whose consultation distance overlaps with the consultation distance of adjoining sites which extend into the County.

DM POL 33:         To comply with the Seveso III Directive in reducing the risk and limiting the potential consequences of major industrial accidents.

DM POL 34:         To permit new Seveso development only in low risk locations within acceptable distances from vulnerable residential, retail and commercial development.

DM POL 35:         To ensure that land use policies take account of the need to maintain appropriate distances  between  future  major  accident  hazard  establishments  and   residential areas, areas of substantial public use and of particular natural sensitivity or interest.

DM POL 36:         To have regard to the advice of the Health & Safety Authority when proposals for new SEVESO sites are being considered or modifications to existing Seveso sites   are being considered.                          

DM POL 37:         To have regard to the advice of the Health & Safety Authority when proposals for development within the consultation zone of a SEVESO site are being considered.

DM OBJ 112:       Have regard to the provision of the ‘Major Accident Directive’ (Seveso III) (European Council Directive 2012/18/EU) and in consultation with the HSA impose restrictions, on developments adjoining or within proximity of a Seveso site. The extent of restrictions on development will be dependent on the type of risk present and the quantity and form of the dangerous substance present or likely to be present.

Section 14 - Land Use Zoning Objectives
 

11.14.1 Introduction

This section sets out the general land use and zoning policies and objectives of this Plan. These zoning policies primarily relate to urban areas. The zoning strategy for the County is based on the following principles:

  • To ensure that sufficient lands are zoned to allow the aims of the Core Strategy to be realised.
  • The consolidation of development in established settlements that identifies opportunities for the redevelopment of under-utilised infill and brownfield lands in order to add vitality to existing settlements and to ensure the efficient use of urban lands.
  • To support the intensification of development in centres in the upper tiers of the settlement hierarchy adjacent or close to public transport nodes and corridors to maximise the use of public transport, minimise trip generation and distribution and to promote sustainable development.
  • To support the creation of compact settlements by following the sequential approach in the identification of lands for development.
  • To promote particular classes of use in appropriate locations and to provide certainty to the public and in particular communities and investors.
  • To promote and support economic development and employment generation in suitable locations.
  • To promote and support ‘live work’ communities in suitable locations.
  • To only consider lands for zoning if there is a likelihood that these lands can be accessed and serviced within the life of the Plan.
  • To protect and promote our rural areas and rural nodes for a range of appropriate uses acknowledging, biodiversity, the rural landscape, and the built and cultural heritage.

11.14.2 Permissible and Non-Permissible Uses

This section provides guidance on the various uses that are considered acceptable in principle in  each of the zoning objectives. Uses other than the primary use for which an area is zoned may be permitted provided the use is not in conflict with the zoning objective or any other policies and objectives in the Plan.

Any use not listed in the permissible or open for consideration categories is deemed not to be acceptable in principle. Such uses will be considered on their individual merits and will only be permitted if they enhance, complement, are ancillary to, or neutral to the zoning objective.

There are instances across the County of established uses that do not conform to the zoning objective for the particular location. Any proposals for the expansion, improvement, or alteration of such uses will be considered on their merits.

The guidance provided in this section is not intended to replace the normal planning process. An indication that a proposal would be ‘permissible’ within a particular land use zoning objective should in no way be taken to imply a grant of permission, or indeed that a planning application may necessarily be successful.

Individual applications are a matter for the Council to decide upon, taking into consideration the wider policies and objectives that pertain to statutory land use planning including Development Plan Standards, Ministerial Guidance, and the merits of individual proposals.

11.14.3 Permissible Uses

A “permissible use” is one which is generally acceptable in principle in the relevant zone, but which is subject to normal planning consideration, including policies and objectives outlined in the Plan.

11.14.4 Open for Consideration Uses

An “open for consideration use” is one which may be permitted where the Council is satisfied that the proposed development would be compatible with the overall policies and objectives for the zone, would not have undesirable effects on any permitted uses, and would otherwise be consistent with the proper planning and sustainable development of the area.

11.14.5 Relaxation of Zoning Objectives for Protected Structures

The Council actively encourages and supports uses which are compatible with the character of Protected Structures. In certain limited cases, to ensure the long-term viability of a Protected Structure, it may be considered appropriate not to stringently apply generic zoning restrictions, including site development standards, provided the Protected Structure is being restored to the highest standard, the special interest, character and setting of the building is protected and the use and development is consistent with conservation policies and the proper planning and sustainable development of the area.

11.14.6 Land Use Zoning Categories

This section sets out the details of each of the zoning categories, including the specific zoning objective and permissible uses and uses open for consideration.

For clarification purposes the definition of the following uses included in these categories are as follows:

  • A Convenience outlet is a single level store selling food and other convenience items with a net sales area of not more than 200m².
  • A Health Care Centre is a standalone premise (i.e. not connected with a dwelling) generally with multiple consulting rooms which may cover a variety of health disciplines.
  • A Healthcare Practitioner is a practice operated by the owner/occupier of a dwelling and which is ancillary to the primary use of the dwelling as a normal place of residence.
  • Home based economic activities are small scale commercial and professional activities carried out by the owner/occupier of the property that is ancillary to the main use of the property as residential accommodation.
  • A Supermarket is a single level, self-service store selling mainly food, with a net retail floorspace less than 2,500m².
  • A Superstore is generally a single level, self-service store selling mainly food, or food and some non-food goods, with at least 2,500m² net retail floorspace but not greater than 5,000m² net retail floorspace and with integrated or shared parking.
  • A Shop is a comparison retail outlet excluding retail warehouse units.
  • Sheltered Housing: The Irish Council for Social Housing define sheltered housing as schemes with onsite communal facilities for assisted independent living. Sheltered housing schemes usually have an on-site warden, may include care supports such as the provision of meals and assistance with personal hygiene, and on site facilities can include recreation areas, alarm systems, and a laundry.
  • Utilities comprise of water, wastewater, electricity, telecommunications, transport infrastructure.

Zoning Category

A1 Existing Residential

Objective: To protect and enhance the amenity and character of existing residential communities

Guidance

Lands identified as ‘Existing Residential’ are established residential areas. Development proposals on these lands primarily consist of infill developments and the extension and refurbishment of existing properties. The principle of such proposals are normally acceptable subject to the amenities of surrounding properties being protected and the use, scale, character and design of any development respecting the character of the area.

Permitted Uses

Residential , Sheltered Housing, B & B / Guest House, Community Facility / Centre, Home Based Economic Activities, Utilities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Bring Banks, Convenience Outlet, Childcare Facility, Halting Site, Sheltered Housing, Healthcare Practitioner, Leisure / Recreation / Sports Facilities, Bar, Retirement Home / Residential Institution / Retirement Village, and Veterinary Surgery.

Zoning Category

A2        New Residential

Objective:   To   provide   for   new   residential   communities   with   ancillary   community  facilities, neigbourhood facilities as considered appropriate. 

Guidance

This is the primary zone to accommodate new residential development.

Whilst residential zoned lands are primarily intended for residential accommodation, these lands may also include other uses that would support the establishment of residential communities. This could include community, recreational and local shopping facilities.

These facilities must be at an appropriate scale and cannot interfere with the primary residential  use of the land. The detail of ancillary uses to be provided as part of a residential development shall form part of pre-application discussions in respect of any planning proposal unless otherwise indicated in Volume 2  of the Development Plan.

Individual convenience stores in neighbourhood centres on A2 zoned lands should generally not exceed 1,000m² net retail floorspace unless otherwise identified in a Local Area Plan.

In order to protect the built heritage in the County sensitivity should be given to the design of any residential development within the grounds of or in proximity to any protected structures(Please refer to Appendix 6).

Permitted Uses

Residential / Sheltered Housing, B & B / Guest House, Bring Banks, Community Facility / Centre, Childcare Facility, Convenience Outlet, Childcare Facility, Children Play / Adventure Centre, Education (Primary or Second Level), Halting Site / Group Housing, Home Based Economic Activities, Leisure / Recreation / Sports Facilities, Retirement Home / Residential Institution / Retirement Village, Utilities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Betting Office, Caravan Park, Cultural Facility, Education (Third Level), Enterprise Centre, Health Centre, Healthcare Practitioner, Hotel / Motel / Hostel, Offices <100m (not for visiting members of the public), Place of Public Worship, Bar/ Restaurant / Café, Take-Away / Fast Food Outlet, Veterinary Surgery.

Zoning Category

B1       Commercial/Town or Village Centre

Objective: To protect, provide for and/or improve town and village centre facilities and uses

Guidance

Town and Village centres are characterised by a concentration of shops, services, meeting points,  and places of employment. Centres in the upper tier of the settlement hierarchy have a more comprehensive range of shops and services than smaller settlements.

The majority of new commercial and retail uses will be accommodated on B1 lands in towns and villages. Whilst the principle of a retail outlet on town/village centre lands is acceptable in principle, the size and scale of any such development should be reflective of the role and function of the town and village in the settlement hierarchy. Such developments will be assessed against the relevant policies and objectives in the Retail Strategy in Appendix 4, retail policy in Chapter 4 of this Plan, the DECLG ‘Guidelines for Planning Authorities Retail Planning’ (2012) and Section 6 of this Chapter.

The primary land use in B1 zones is employment generating, service and retail provision. In order to achieve balanced development and create vibrant urban communities, residential use can also be considered on these lands. In order to ensure the delivery of commercial uses commensurate with the status of the settlement the percentage of residential development in B1 zones shall generally not exceed 30 % of the quantum of a development site in any development proposal in Key Towns, Self- sustaining Growth Towns, Self Sustaining Towns. Exceptions may be facilitated on a case by case basis.

Permitted Uses

B & B / Guest House, Bank / Financial Institution, Betting Office, Bring Banks, Cinema, Community Facility / Centre, Conference/Event Centre, Convenience Outlet, Childcare Facility, Children Play / Adventure Centre, Cultural Facility, Night Club, Education (Primary or Second  Level),  Education (Third Level), Funeral Home, Health Centre, Healthcare Practitioner, Home Based Economic Activities, Hotel / Motel / Hostel, Leisure / Recreation / Sports Facilities, Research & Development, Offices <100m², Offices 100 to 1,000m², Offices >1,000m², Place of Public Worship, Public House, Residential / Sheltered Housing, Restaurant / Café, Supermarket / Superstore, Shop, Take-Away / Fast Food Outlet, Telecommunication Structures, Veterinary Surgery, utilities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Amusement Arcade, Car Park (incl. Park and Ride), Enterprise Centre, Garden  Centre,  Hospital, Motor Sales / Repair, Plant & Tool Hire, Factory Outlet Stores, Retirement Home / Residential Institution / Retirement Village, Science & Technology Based Enterprise.

Zoning Category

B2 Retail Warehouse Park

Objective:  To provide for the development of a retail warehouse park

Guidance

The objective of B2 zones is to provide for the development of retail warehouse parks.

Permitted Uses

Cinema, Factory Outlet Stores, Leisure / Recreation / Sports Facilities, Retail Warehouse, Telecommunication Structures, Service Stations, Utilities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Bring Banks, Childcare Facility, Children Play / Adventure Centre, Drive Through Restaurant, Enterprise Centre, Garden Centre, Research & Development, Motor Sales / Repair, Offices Uses (where the services are not principally for visiting members of the public), Restaurant / Café, Take-Away / Fast Food Outlet, Science & Technology Based Enterprise, Wholesale Warehousing / Cash and Carry

Zoning Category

C1 Mixed Use

Objective:  To provide for and facilitate mixed residential and employment generating uses

Guidance

Lands identified for mixed use development are only appropriate in higher tier settlements. The objective  on  these  lands  is  to  provide  opportunities  for  high  density  mixed  use     employment generating activities that also accommodate appropriate levels of residential development thereby facilitating the creation of functional ‘live work’ communities. These areas are generally located in proximity to high frequency public transport corridors.  In order to achieve balanced development the percentage of residential development in C1 zones shall generally not exceed 50 % of the quantum of a development site.

Permitted Uses

B & B / Guest House, Bring Banks, Childcare Facility, Children Play / Adventure Centre, Community Facility / Centre, Convenience Outlet, Cultural Facility, Education (Primary or Second Level), Education (Third Level), Enterprise Centre, Health Centre, Healthcare Practitioner, Home Based Economic Activities, Hotel / Motel / Hostel, Offices <100m² Offices 100 to 1,00m², Offices >1,000m², Service Station, Place of Public Worship, Pub, Residential / Sheltered Housing, Restaurant / Café, Utilities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Betting Office, Car Park (incl. Park and Ride), Cinema, Conference/Event Centre, Dance Hall / Night Club, Drive Through Restaurant, Funeral Home, Garden Centre, Hospital, Industry – Light, Leisure / Recreation / Sports Facilities, Motor Sales / Repair, Offices >1,000m², Plant & Tool Hire, Research & Development, Retirement Home / Residential Institution/Retirement Village, Science & Technology Based Enterprise, Shop, Supermarket, Take-Away / Fast Food Outlet, Telecommunication Structures, Veterinary Surgery, Wholesale Warehousing / Cash and Carry.

Zoning Category

D1 Tourism

Objective  To provide for appropriate and sustainable visitor and tourist facilities and associated uses

Guidance

D1 zones have been identified to provide for tourism type uses such as accommodation, and entertainment.

Permitted Uses

B & B / Guest House, Caravan Park, Children Play / Adventure Centre, Community Facility / Centre, Conference/Event Centre, Medical & related uses, Craft Centre / Craft Shop, Cultural Facility, Hotel / Motel / Hostel, Leisure / Recreation / Sports Facilities, Restaurant / Café, Water Services / Public Services.

Open for Consideration Uses

Amusement Arcade, Cinema, Convenience Outlet, Childcare Facility, Cultural Facility, Dance Hall / Night Club, Offices <100m², Public House, Shop, niche type commercial supports, Telecommunication Structures, bona fide ancillary tourism residential, holiday home.

Zoning Category

E1 Strategic Employment Zones (High Technology  Uses)

Objective To facilitate opportunities for high end technology/manufacturing and major campus style office based employment within high quality and accessible locations

Guidance

E1 zones facilitate opportunities for high end, high value added businesses and corporate headquarters. This adheres to the concept of 4th Generation Science & Technology Parks. It is envisaged that such locations are suitable for high density employment generating activity with associated commercial development located adjacent to or in close proximity to high frequency public transport corridors. This will apply to suitable lands in Navan, Drogheda, Dunboyne and Maynooth Environs.

Permitted Uses

Bio Technology Manufacturing, Call Centres, Childcare Facility, Convenience Outlet, Cafe, Leisure facilities, Data Centres, Green / Clean Light Industries, Education (third level), High Technology Manufacturing, Information Communication Technologies, International and National Traded Services, Knowledge Based Economic Development, Offices 100 to 1,000m², Offices >1,000m², Medical and Related Uses (includes hospital), Research & Development, Science & Technology Based Enterprise, Telecommunication Structures, Utilities, Public Park.

Open for Consideration Uses

Conference/Event Centre, Education, Enterprise / Training Centre, Hotel / Aparthotel, Industry – Light, Transport Depot/Logistics, Warehousing.

Uses which are ‘open for consideration’ or not identified as ‘permitted’ under the E1 zoning  objective will only be considered where they do not compromise the objective of the overall zoning objective of E1 lands, as a strategic employment zone for high technology uses

Zoning Category

E2 General Enterprise and  Employment

Objective    To provide for the creation of enterprise and facilitate opportunities for employment through industrial, manafacturing, distribution, warehousing and other general employment/enterprise uses in a good quality physical environment.

Guidance

E2 lands constitute an important land bank for employment use which must be protected. The development of E2 lands seek to provide for the creation and production of enterprise and facilitate opportunities for industrial, manufacturing, distribution, warehousing and other general employment / enterprise uses in a good quality physical environment.

Permitted Uses

Bring Banks, Builder’s Providers, Childcare Facility, Car Park (incl. Park and Ride), CHP / Waste to Energy Facilities, Domestic Fuel Depot, Energy Installation, Enterprise & Business Start Ups, Enterprise / Training Centre, Data Centres, Factory Shop, Furniture Showroom (only where product displayed is manufactured on site), Go Kart Track, Industry – General, Industry – Light, Heavy Vehicle Park, Logistics, Mart / Co-op, Motor Repair / Servicing, Plant & Tool Hire, Recycling Facility (Civic & Amenity), Science & Technology Based Enterprise, Telecommunication Structures, Transport Depot, Warehousing, Utilities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Abattoir, Car Dismantler / Scrap Yard, Construction & Demolition Waste Recycling Facility, Garden Centre, Leisure Facilities, Motor Sales, Offices 100 – 1,000m (uses where the services are not principally for visiting members of the public), Service Station, Restaurant / Café, Veterinary Surgery, Waste Recycling / Transfer / Sorting Centre, Wholesale Warehousing / Cash and Carry.

Uses which are ‘open for consideration’ or not identified as ‘permitted’ under the E2 zoning  objective will only be considered where they do not compromise the objective of the overall zoning objective of E2 lands, for general enterprise and employment uses.

Zoning Category

E3      Warehousing and  Distribution

Objective   To facilitate logistics, warehousing, distribution and supply chain management inclusive of related industry facilities which require food access to the major road network.

Permitted Uses

Bring Banks, Childcare Facility, Car Park (incl. Park and Ride), CHP / Waste to Energy Facilities, Data Centres, Distribution & Supply Chain Management, Domestic Fuel Depot, Energy Installation, Fuel Depot, Heavy Vehicle Park, Logistics, Plant Storage, Recycling Facility (Civic & Amenity), Telecommunication Storage Depot, Transport Depot, Warehousing, Water Services / Public Services, Wholesale Warehousing / Cash and Carry, Utilities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Enterprise & Business Start Ups, Enterprise/Training Centre, Garden Centre, Industry – Light, Petrol Station, Restaurant / Café, Waste Recycling / Transfer / Sorting Centre.

Uses which are ‘open for consideration’ or not identified as ‘permitted’ under the E3 zoning  objective will only be considered where they do not compromise the objective of the overall zoning objective of E3  lands, for general enterprise and employment uses.

Zoning Category

F1      Open Space

Objective    To provide for and improve open spaces for active and passive recreational amenities

Guidance

The Planning Authority will consider development proposals for utility development and transportation infrastructure on F1 Open Space zoned land on a case by case basis subject to the works being ancillary to and necessary for the appropriate development of adjacent lands. In all instances the integrity of the open space land as an amenity area shall not be significantly reduced.

Permitted Uses

Car Park for Recreational Purposes, Craft Centre / Craft Shop, Community Facility / Centre, Cultural Facility, Cycleways / Greenways / Trail Development, Leisure / Recreation / Sports Facilities, Playing Pitches, Playgrounds, Utilities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Allotments, Bring Banks, Childcare Facility, Place of Public Worship, vehicular/cyclist/pedestrian access to zoned lands where appropriate.

Zoning Category

G1 Community Infrastructure

Objective    To provide for necessary community, social, and educational facilities

Permitted Uses

Allotments, Car Park (incl. Park and Ride), Cemetery/Crematorium, Children Play / Adventure Centre, Childcare Facility, Community Facility / Centre, Cultural Facility, Education , Health Centre, Hospital, Leisure / Recreation / Sports Facilities, Place of Public Worship, Playing Pitches, Playgrounds, Recycling Facility (Civic & Amenity ), Utilities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Bring Banks, Funeral Home, Gymnasium, Halting Site / Group Housing, Healthcare Practitioner, Residential / Sheltered Housing, Restaurant / Café, Retirement Home / Residential Institution / Retirement Village, Telecommunication Structures.

Zoning Category

H1 High Amenity
Objective  To protect and improve areas of high amenity 

Permitted Uses

Cycleways / Greenways / Trail Development, Land & Water Based Recreational Activities Open Space, Cultural Activities.

Open for Consideration Uses

Kiosk, Restaurant, Tea Room, Sensitive re-use of existing structures

Zoning Category

R1 Rail Corridor

Objective  To provide for a strategic rail corridor and associated physical infrastructure

Guidance

The RSES includes an objective supporting the implementation of the extension of the rail from Dunboyne to Navan (This is subject to a Draft Ministerial Direction in relation to the RSES 2019-2031). The protection of the designed route of the extension of the Clonsilla to Parkway rail line to Navan differs from most of the land use zoning objectives included in this Development Plan. It has a single purpose use which is to protect the designed route from development which would compromise its future delivery. It is not necessary to therefore identify the suitability or otherwise of individual uses on said lands as the intention of Meath County Council is clear.

Zoning Category

WL  White Lands

Objective  To protect strategic lands from inappropriate forms of development which would impede the orderly expansion of a strategic urban centre 

Guidance

White Lands are located in Navan, South Drogheda, Kells, East Meath, Kilmessan, Enfield and Ratoath. These are strategic lands and their designation is to allow for a long term, integrated approach to be the taken to the expansion of an urban area. It is not generally envisaged that development proposals will be brought forward during the life of this Development Plan for such lands. No indication is therefore generally offered regarding the suitability or otherwise of individual uses on said lands within this Development Plan. Should the Planning Authority be satisfied that a project proposed for lands with a white land designation would assist with the implementation of the Economic Strategy and education provision, these lands can be released for employment creating development during the plan period in accordance with the Economic Strategy. White Lands should only be released where it would lead to significant employment creation, education provision or which cannot reasonably be accommodated on other employment zoned land.

Zoning Category

TU Transport and Utility Infrastructure

Objective    To provide for essential transport and public utilities and infrastructure including rail stations, park and ride facilities, water and waste water infrastructure, electricity, gas, and telecommunications infrastructure.

Guidance

Guidance: These lands have been identified to provide for essential public infrastructure. The nature of these facilities is such that the use of the lands is dedicated to the provision and maintenance of this infrastructure. It is acknowledged however that there are instances where additional uses may be appropriate. This would primarily relate to rail stations and park and ride facilities close to or within town centres where additional commercial uses may be acceptable. Applications for a commercial/mixed use on such lands will be assessed on a case by case basis and will be required to demonstrate that such a use would be compatible to the location and would not undermine the primary use of the land which is to provide essential infrastructure and services.

Zoning Category

RA Rural Areas

Objective: To protect and promote in a balanced way, the development of agriculture, forestry and sustainable rural-related enterprise, community facilities, biodiversity, the rural landscape, and   the built and cultural heritage. 

Guidance

The primary objective is to protect and promote the value and future sustainability of rural areas. Agriculture, forestry, tourism and rural related resource enterprises will be employed for the benefit of the local and wider population. A balanced approach involving the protection and promotion of rural biodiversity, promotion of the integrity of the landscape, and enhancement of the built and cultural heritage will be adopted.

Permitted Uses

Agriculture, Agricultural Buildings, Agri-Tourism, Boarding Kennels (Where the use is ancillary to the use of the dwelling as a main residence), Burial Grounds, Extractive Industry/Quarrying, Equestrian, Farm Shop (Only where the bulk of the produce is produced on the farm), Forestry related activities, Horticulture, Caravan and Camping Park (No static mobile homes or permanent structure (unless ancillary to the operation of the campsite) shall be permitted), Golf Course, Open Space, Research and Development (Rural related research and development only), Residential (Subject to compliance with the Rural Settlement Strategy), Restaurant/Café (Only where ancillary to tourism uses or conversion of protected or vernacular structures), Sustainable Energy Installations, Utility Structures.

Open for Consideration Uses

Community Facility, Cultural Facility, Education, Garden Centre, Micro Businesses (Refer to the Economic Chapter), Playing Fields, Recreational Facility, Sports Club, Telecommunication Structures, Workshop (only where ancillary to an existing dwelling where it is demonstrated that the proposed activity is carried out by a resident of the dwelling, with no visiting members of the public), Veterinary Clinic.

Zoning Category

RN Rural Nodes

Objective:     To  provide  for  small  scale  infill  development  including  community  facilities and supporting services serving local needs while maintaining the rural nature ofthe node.                                                                                                                                                                                

Guidance

Rural Nodes are intended to provide a viable alternative to settlement in the open countryside and  to support small –scale infill development by providing the rural community with an opportunity to choose more rural-style housing than is provided within villages and towns. Rural nodes are to develop as local centres for rural catchments, with growth appropriate to cater for local demand, by facilitating the development of small scale and home-based enterprise among members of the rural community.

Permitted Uses

Agri-Tourism, Artisan Retail, Burial Grounds, Community Facility, Cultural Facility, Childcare Facilities, Education, Farm Shop (only where the bulk of the produce is produced on the farm), Guest House (where the use is ancillary to the use of the dwelling as a main entrance), Health Practitioner, Open Space, Park/Playground, Playing Fields, Public House, Recreational Facility/Sports Club, Residential (subject to compliance with the Rural Settlement Strategy), Retail – Local,  Restaurant/Café (only where ancillary to tourism uses or conversion of protected or vernacular structures),  , Sustainable Energy Installations, Utility Structures, Veterinary Clinic.

Open for Consideration Uses

Agricultural Buildings, Boarding Kennels (where the use is ancillary to the use of the dwelling as a main entrance), Caravan and Camping Park (no static mobile homes or permanent structure), Golf Course, Micro- businesses, Place of Worship, Research and Development (rural related research and development only), Workshop (only where ancillary to an existing dwelling where it is demonstrated that the proposed activity is carried out by a resident of the dwelling with no visiting members of the public)

11.15 Masterplans

The following is a list of the Masterplans within each settlement in the county. The previous reference number is detailed along with the new  Masterplan reference number. In total there are 38 Masterplans.

Settlement

Draft Plan MP Reference

New Reference

Address/Location

Navan

MP 1

MP 1

Abbeylands/Blackcastle Demense, north or the River Blackwater and the R147, east of the N51 at the bottom of Flower Hill, includes Elliott’s Mill

Navan

MP 2

MP 2

Abbeyland South, north of R147, includes Balmoral Industrial Estate

Navan

MP 3

MP 3

Abbeylands, located between Blackwater Public Park and former Kingscourt Rail Line

Navan

MP 4

MP 4

Clonmaggaden, north of link road between Proudstown Road and Ratholdron Road and south of Kilsaran Lane

Navan

MP 5

MP 5

Blackcastle Demesne, area surrounding Blackcastle House, north of the River Boyne

Navan

MP 6

MP 6

Townparks, located between Carriage Road, Trim Road and Dan Shaw Road

Navan

MP 7

MP 7

Townparks/Robinrath, located between Athboy Road and M3 north link road, north of Mullaghboy Industrial Estate

Navan

MP 8

MP 8

Balreask Old/Limekilnhill, between Trim Road and former Navan-Dublin Rail line

Navan

MP 9

MP 9

Pairc Tailteann Lands

Navan

MP 10

MP 10

Balreask Old, lands between Trim Road, Borallion Road and former Navan-Dublin Rail line

Navan

MP 11

MP 11

Nevinstown/Windtown, south of Ratholdron Road and north of River Boyne

Navan

MP 12

MP 12

Athlumney, Alexander Reid, Bailis, Farganstown and
Ballymacon, between Kentstown Road and Navan-Drogheda Rail line

Navan

MP 13

MP 13

Balreask Old, lands between Trim Road and Commons Road

Drogheda Environs

MP1

MP14

Colpe, lands to the north of Mill Road and south of Marsh Road

Drogheda Environs

MP2

MP15

Bryanstown, lands served by Bryanstown and Beymore Roads

Maynooth Environs

MP 1

MP16

Moygaddy Lands

Maynooth Environs

MP 2

MP17

Carton Demesne lands

Ashbourne

MP 1

MP18

Milltown, south of Ashbourne, off the N2

Ashbourne

MP 2

MP19

Rath, to north of Ashbourne, off the N2

Ashbourne

MP 3

MP20

Donaghmore/Milltown, south of Ashbourne, west of the N2 and north of the R125

Ashbourne

MP4

MP21

Future public park lands

Dunboyne Clonee

MP 1

MP22

Dunboyne North

Dunboyne - Clonee

MP 2

MP23

Bracetown/Gunnocks

Dunboyne - Clonee

MP 3

MP24

Pace, between Piercetown and Bracetown, east of the M3 Motorway.

Kells

MP 1

MP25

The Backlands

Kells

MP 2

MP26

The Frontlands

Kells

MP 3

MP27

East of Kells Business Park

Kells

MP 4

MP28

Headfort Demesne, south of R147

Trim

MP 1

MP29

Newtown, lands between Navan and Dublin Roads

Trim

MP 2

MP30

Former Potterton Cattles Sales, lands between Kinnegad and Longwood Roads

Trim

new MP

MP31

Lands to the west of Trim which include the OPW building and buildings which front onto Emmet Street

Enfield

MP 1

MP32

Johnstown, lands to the north of R148

Ratoath

MP 1

MP33

Fairyhouse/Tattersalls and lands to the north

Ratoath

MP 2

MP34

Commons/Ratoath, southwest of Ratoath

Ratoath

MP 3

MP35

Jamestown, east of Ratoath, served by RORR

Ratoath

MP 4

MP36

Ratoath, lands east of Ratoath, north of R125

Ratoath

MP 5

MP37

Commons, south of Ratoath

Oldcastle

MP1

MP38

To the rear of Cavan Street and Cogan Street